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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln — Volume 3 The Lincoln-Douglas debates   By: (1809-1865)

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln — Volume 3: The Lincoln-Douglas Debates by Abraham Lincoln is an extraordinary compilation that provides readers with an unprecedented insight into the mind and political philosophy of one of America's greatest statesmen. As the title suggests, this volume centers around the iconic debates between Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas during their 1858 senatorial campaign in Illinois.

From the very beginning, it is clear that this volume is an essential addition to any history lover's collection. The book does an impeccable job of presenting Lincoln's speeches, letters, and other written expressions in a well-organized and easily accessible format. The inclusion of both Lincoln's and Douglas' speeches in the debates allows readers to fully immerse themselves in the intense political atmosphere of the time.

What makes this collection particularly remarkable is the way it sheds light on Lincoln's core beliefs and values. Through his eloquence and carefully crafted arguments, Lincoln demonstrates his unwavering commitment to the principles of equality and liberty. Reading his words, one can feel Lincoln's genuine desire to reconcile the divided nation and eliminate the injustice of slavery. It is a testament to his brilliance as a thinker and his exceptional rhetorical skills.

Furthermore, the comprehensive introduction and explanatory notes provided by the editor enhance the reader's understanding of the historical context and significance of the debates. These additions ensure that readers, regardless of their level of familiarity with the subject matter, are able to appreciate the depth of Lincoln's words and the lasting impact they have had on American society.

Perhaps what is most fascinating about this volume is witnessing the intellectual sparring between Lincoln and Douglas. Their debates showcased not only their opposing views on the issue of slavery but also their contrasting oratory styles. This book allows readers to witness the evolution of Lincoln's arguments and provides valuable insight into his strategic thinking as he navigated the treacherous political landscape of the time.

While the volume primarily focuses on the Lincoln-Douglas debates, it also includes a variety of Lincoln's other writings, such as important speeches and letters. This diverse selection allows readers to gain a comprehensive understanding of Lincoln's ideas and the challenges he faced during his political career.

In conclusion, The Writings of Abraham Lincoln — Volume 3: The Lincoln-Douglas Debates is an exceptional collection that offers an intimate glimpse into the mind of one of America's most celebrated leaders. Lincoln's words continue to resonate and inspire, making this volume an essential read for anyone interested in American history, politics, or the power of effective communication.

First Page:

THE PAPERS AND WRITINGS OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN

VOLUME THREE

CONSTITUTIONAL EDITION

By Abraham Lincoln

Edited by Arthur Brooks Lapsley

THE LINCOLN DOUGLAS DEBATES I

POLITICAL SPEECHES & DEBATES of LINCOLN WITH DOUGLAS In the Senatorial Campaign of 1858 in Illinois SPEECH AT SPRINGFIELD, JUNE 17, 1858

[The following speech was delivered at Springfield, Ill., at the close of the Republican State Convention held at that time and place, and by which Convention Mr. LINCOLN had been named as their candidate for United States Senator. Mr. DOUGLAS was not present.]

Mr. PRESIDENT AND GENTLEMEN OF THE CONVENTION: If we could first know where we are, and whither we are tending, we could better judge what to do, and how to do it. We are now far into the fifth year since a policy was initiated with the avowed object and confident promise of putting an end to slavery agitation. Under the operation of that policy, that agitation has not only not ceased, but has constantly augmented. In my opinion, it will not cease until a crisis shall have been reached and passed. "A house divided against itself cannot stand." I believe this government cannot endure permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved; I do not expect the house to fall; but I do expect it will cease to be divided... Continue reading book >>




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