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By: David Christie Murray (1847-1907)

Book cover In Direst Peril
Book cover Young Mr. Barter's Repentance From "Schwartz" by David Christie Murray
Book cover An Old Meerschaum From Coals Of Fire And Other Stories, Volume II. (of III.)
Book cover Cruel Barbara Allen From Coals Of Fire And Other Stories, Volume II. (of III.)
Book cover The Romance Of Giovanni Calvotti From Coals Of Fire And Other Stories, Volume II. (of III.)

By: David Cory (1872-1966)

Book cover The Magic Soap Bubble
Book cover The Iceberg Express
Book cover Little Jack Rabbit's Adventures
Book cover Little Jack Rabbit and the Squirrel Brothers
Book cover The Cruise of the Noah's Ark
Book cover Billy Bunny and Uncle Bull Frog

By: David Garnett (1892-1981)

Lady into Fox by David Garnett Lady into Fox

When Sylvia Tebrick, the 24-year-old wife of Richard Tebrick, suddenly turns into a fox while they are out walking in the woods, Mr. Tebrick sends away all the servants in an attempt to keep Sylvia's new nature a secret. Both then struggle to come to terms with the problems the change brings about.

By: David Graham Phillips (1867-1911)

Book cover Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise
Book cover The Grain of Dust
Book cover The Plum Tree
Book cover The Conflict

By: David Henry Keller (1880-1966)

Book cover The Rat Racket

By: David James Burrell (1844-1926)

Book cover The Centurion's Story

By: David Lindsay (1876-1945)

A Voyage to Arcturus by David Lindsay A Voyage to Arcturus

A Voyage to Arcturus is a novel by Scottish writer David Lindsay, first published in 1920. It combines fantasy, philosophy, and science fiction in an exploration of the nature of good and evil and their relationship with existence. It has been described by critic and philosopher Colin Wilson as the "greatest novel of the twentieth century" and was a central influence on C. S. Lewis's Space Trilogy.

By: David Whitelaw

The Princess Galva by David Whitelaw The Princess Galva

Edward Povey had been a correspondence clerk for twenty-two years when he was summarily dismissed. So how did he find himself mixed up with an orphan girl, who was really a princess, as she sought to reclaim her throne from the man who had killed her parents? Well, however it had happened, it was romantic. And after two decades in the basement office of a shipping company, he was ready for a bit of romance. (Introduction by MaryAnn)

By: Day Kellogg Lee (1816-1869)

Book cover Summerfield or, Life on a Farm

By: Dillon Wallace (1863-1939)

Book cover The Gaunt Gray Wolf A Tale of Adventure With Ungava Bob
Book cover Ungava Bob A Winter's Tale
Book cover Left on the Labrador A Tale of Adventure Down North

By: Dinah Craik (1826-1887)

John Halifax, Gentleman by Dinah Craik John Halifax, Gentleman

This novel, published in 1856, was one of the popular and beloved novels in the Victorian era. It is told in the first person by Phineas Fletcher, an invalid son of a Quaker tanner who is presented to us in the beginning as a lonely youth. John Halifax, the first friend he ever had, is a poor orphan who is taken in by his father to help in the work which his sickly son can't constantly do. Phineas tells us in an unforgettable way how John succeeded in rising from his humble beginning and become a wealthy and successful man. But with the money come horrible troubles... In an unforgettable manner, we learn to know all the characters of the novel as if they really lived.

By: Dinah Maria Craik (1826-1887)

Olive by Dinah Maria Craik Olive

Inspired by Jane Eyre, Dinah Maria Craik's 1850 novel, Olive, was one of the first to feature a disabled central character. 'Slightly deformed' from birth, Olive believes that she will never be able to marry like other women, so she devotes her life to her art, her mother, and above all, her religion. It takes a dark secret from the past and a new, fascinating acquaintance, to make her realize what her life could be.

By: Dinah Maria Mulock Craik (1826-1887)

Book cover Fairy Book

The sleeping beauty in the wood -- Hop-O'-My-Thumb -- Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper -- Adventures of John Dietrich -- Beauty and the Beast -- Little One Eye, Little Two Eyes, and Little Three Eyes -- Jack the giant-killer -- Tom Thumb -- Rumpelstilzchen -- Fortunatus -- The Bremen Town Musicians -- Riquet with the tuft -- House Island -- Snow-White and Rose-Red -- Jack and the bean-stalk -- Graciosa and Percinet -- The iron stove -- The invisible prince -- The woodcutter's daughter --...

Book cover The Adventures of A Brownie As Told to My Child by Miss Mulock
Book cover Agatha's Husband A Novel

By: Dion Clayton Calthrop (1878-1937)

Book cover The Pirate's Pocket Book

By: Don Marquis (1878-1937)

Book cover The Cruise of the Jasper B.
Book cover Hermione's Group of Thinkers

By: Don Peterson

Book cover The White Feather Hex

By: Donald Alexander Mackenzie (1873-1936)

Elves and Heroes by Donald Alexander Mackenzie Elves and Heroes

This volume describes, in verse, the mythical creatures and people of ancient Scotland. It also includes explanatory notes about about the characters and folk tales that inspired the author's poetry. (Introduction by Matthew Reece)

By: Donald Ferguson

Book cover The Chums of Scranton High at Ice Hockey
Book cover The Chums of Scranton High Or, Hugh Morgan's Uphill Fight
Book cover The Chums of Scranton High out for the Pennant or, In the Three Town League
Book cover The Chums of Scranton High on the Cinder Path

By: Donald McGibney

32 Caliber by Donald McGibney 32 Caliber

The recent interest that's being generated in the pulp fiction writers of the 1920s has lead to many of the books of that genre being resurrected and read once again. For modern-day readers, these represent what are now called “airport-lounge reads” and ideal for those few hours that you have to kill waiting in an airport or railway station, while traveling or on holiday, when you don't want anything too heavy to weigh you down! Pulp fiction, so called because the books were generally printed on cheaper paper made from recycled wood pulp, had certain characteristics...

By: Donald Wollheim (1914-1990)

The Secret Of The Ninth Planet by Donald Wollheim The Secret Of The Ninth Planet

An alien race has put a station on Earth and other planets in order to steal the rays of the sun, possible causing the sun to nova within two years. Burl Denning, a high school student, is the only person who has the power to stop the alien project. Can he and the crew of the experimental space ship Magellan act in time to save the earth?

By: Donn Byrne (1889-1928)

Book cover Messer Marco Polo
Book cover The Wind Bloweth

By: Dornford Yates (1885-1960)

Book cover Berry and Co.
Book cover The Brother of Daphne
Book cover Jonah and Co.

By: Dorothy C. Paine

A Little Florida Lady by Dorothy C. Paine A Little Florida Lady

This is the story of a little girl from New York who moves with her family to Florida in the late 19th Century. Parental warning: as this book was first published in 1903 and set in the American South, and although the author tries to be open-minded, please be aware that there are slang words used for African Americans.

By: Dorothy Canfield Fisher

Understood Betsy by Dorothy Canfield Fisher Understood Betsy

Elizabeth Ann is a timid, sickly little girl who lives with her Aunt Frances and her Great-Aunt Harriet. When Great-Aunt Harriet becomes ill, poor little Elizabeth Ann is sent to live with the much-feared Putney cousins, whom, as Great-Aunt Harriet said “Such lack of sympathy, such perfect indifference to the sacred sensitiveness of child-life, such a starving of the child-heart … No, I shall never forget it! They had chores to do … as though they had been hired men!” But to the Putney cousins in Vermont Elizabeth Ann has to go...

Book cover The Bent Twig

Semi-autobiographical series of incidents in the life of an intellectual American family in the late 19th - early 20th Century as seen by favored daughter, Sylvia Marshall. Her father is an economics professor in a Midwestern state university and she is following in his inquisitive footsteps. Canfield writes this in a matter-of-fact manner with Tarkingtonesque good humor.

Book cover The Squirrel-Cage

By: Dorothy Kilner (1755-1836)

Book cover Life and Perambulations of a Mouse

By: Dorothy Richardson (1873-1957)

Pointed Roofs by Dorothy Richardson Pointed Roofs

Miriam Henderson is one of what novelist Dolf Wyllarde (in her great work, The Pathway of the Pioneer) termed "nous autres," i.e., young gentlewomen who must venture forth and earn their living after their fathers have been financially ruined. Also, she has read Villette; she thus applies for and is offered a job teaching conversational English at a girls' school, albeit in Germany rather than France. Pointed Roofs describes her year abroad, as she endeavors to make her way in the hotbed of seething female personalities that populate the school, overseen by her employer, the formidable Fraulein...

By: Dorothy Whitehill

Book cover Phyllis A Twin

By: Douglas Fairbanks (1883-1939)

Book cover Laugh and Live

Douglas Fairbanks, Sr. (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer. He was best known for his swashbuckling roles in silent films such as The Thief of Baghdad, Robin Hood, and The Mark of Zorro. His book, Laugh and Live, is a book about positive virtues and advice for leading a good, healthy, and successful life. An advisory about this book is in order. Published in 1917, it was written at a time when “men went to work, women kept house, and supported their man”...

By: Douglas Grant (aka Isabel Ostrander) (1883-1924)

Book cover Anything once

An unlikely pair of wanderers they were; the orphan girl Lou and her travelling partner Jim Botts. Jim appeared in need of following some apparent 'rules' during the journey, while Lou seemed in need of better clothing, and perhaps some refinement. But who was most benefitting whom on the week-long journey from rural village to big city? And which of the two was willing to try anything once? (Introduction by Roger Melin)

By: Douglas William Jerrold (1803-1857)

Mrs. Caudle's Curtain Lectures by Douglas William Jerrold Mrs. Caudle's Curtain Lectures

First serialized in Punch magazine in 1845, and officially published in book form in 1846, Mrs. Caudle's Curtain Lectures presents a collection of 37 lectures delivered by Mrs. Caudle to her husband as a means of reproach for his trivial infractions. Also, the author marvelously incorporates typical elements responsible for disagreements between spouses including the antipathetic mother-in-law, the ne’er-do-well friends, and the jealous outbursts. Jerrold’s charming piece of satire introduces the Victorian married couple, Mr...

By: E. (Eliza) Fenwick (1766-1840)

Book cover The Bad Family & Other Stories

By: E. (Emanuel) Haldeman-Julius (1888-1951)

Book cover Dust

By: E. A. Gillie

Barbara in Brittany by E. A. Gillie Barbara in Brittany

Barbara, an English girl and the eldest of her family, spends most days helping her widowed mother care for her younger siblings. Then disaster strikes – or so the children believe! Barbara is taken to France to see Paris by her father’s formidable sister, Aunt Anne. She stays on in Brittany to perfect her French. In this series of funny stories about her adventures in France, we meet a cast of recurring characters – and both Barbara and Aunt Anne find love! (Summary by Sibella Denton)

By: E. C. (Edmund Clerihew) Bentley (1875-1956)

Book cover Trent's Last Case

By: E. Cherubini

Book cover Pinocchio in Africa

By: E. E. Boyd

Book cover 'Our Guy' or, The elder brother

By: E. E. Smith (1895-1965)

Spacehounds of IPC by E. E. Smith Spacehounds of IPC

When the Inter-Planetary Corporation's (IPC) crack liner “IPV Arcturus” took off on a routine flight to Mars, it turned out to be the beginning of a unexpected and long voyage. There had been too many reports of errors in ship's flight positions from the Check Stations and brilliant physicist Dr. Percival (“Steve”) Stevens is aboard the Arcturus on a fact-finding mission to find out what's really happening, and hopefully save the honor of the brave pilots of the space-liner Arcturus from the desk-jockeys' in the Check Stations implications of imprecision - the nastiest insult you could cast at a ships pilot...

Book cover Skylark Three

This is a sequel to The Skylark of Space. The novel concerns Richard Seaton and his allies who have encounters with aliens while fighting DuQuesne and the Fenachrone..

Book cover The Skylark of Space

The Skylark of Space is one of the earliest novels of interstellar travel and is considered a classic of pulp science fiction. Originally serialized in 1928 in the magazine Amazing Stories it is often categorized as the first literary space opera, complete with protagonists perfect in mind, body, and spirit, who fight against villains of absolute evil.

Subspace Survivors by E. E. Smith Subspace Survivors

A team of space travelers are caught in a subspace accident which, up to now, no one has ever survived. But some of the survivors of the Procyon are not ordinary travelers. Their psi abilities allow them to see things before they happen. But will it be enough?Smith's story "Subspace Survivors" first appeared in the July 1960 issue of the magazine Astounding.

Book cover Galaxy Primes

They were four of the greatest minds in the Universe: Two men, two women, lost in an experimental spaceship billions of parsecs from home. And as they mentally charted the Cosmos to find their way back to earth, their own loves and hates were as startling as the worlds they encountered.

By: E. E. “Doc” Smith (1890-1965)

Book cover Triplanetary, First in the Lensman Series

Triplanetary was first serialized in Amazing Stories in 1934. After the Lensman series became popular, Smith took his Triplanetary story and turned it into the first of the Lensman series, using it as a prequel to give the back story for the protaganists in the Lensmen series. He added 6 new chapters, doubling it in size and it's really a different book from the serialized novel, being published 14 years after the first. It was put into Gutenberg just last year. The novel covers several episodes in an eons-long eugenics project of the super-intelligences of the Arisia...

By: E. Everett (Edward Everett) Evans (1893-1958)

Book cover Man of Many Minds

By: E. Frances (Eleanor Frances) Poynter

Book cover My Little Lady

By: E. Gallienne Robin

Book cover Where Deep Seas Moan

By: E. H. (Emily Hilda) Young (1880-1949)

Book cover Moor Fires

By: E. J. (Edith J.) May

Book cover Louis' School Days A Story for Boys

By: E. M. Delafield (1890-1943)

Book cover Consequences

Set in late Victorian England, “Consequences” follows the life of Alexandra Clare, a girl born into an upper class Catholic London family. Raised from birth for the privileged life of a wife and mother, Alexandra never quite fits in with her or her family’s expectations and fails at seemingly everything she tries – school, the marriage market, family life.

By: E. Oe. (Edith Oenone) Somerville (1858-1949)

Book cover Mount Music

By: E. Pauline Johnson (1861-1913)

Book cover The Moccasin Maker

By: E. Phillips

Book cover Sweets for Leisure Hours Amusing Tales for Little Readers

By: E. R. (Ernest Robertson) Punshon (1872-1956)

Book cover The Bittermeads Mystery

By: E. R. Burden

Book cover Hollowmell or, A Schoolgirl's Mission

By: E. Stuart [Illustrator] Hardy

Book cover Laugh and Play A Collection of Original stories

By: E. T. A. Hoffmann (1776-1822)

Master Flea by E. T. A. Hoffmann Master Flea

Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann (1776 – 1822), better known by his pen name E.T.A. Hoffmann (Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann), was a German Romantic author of fantasy and horror, a jurist, composer, music critic, draftsman and caricaturist. Hoffmann's stories were very influential during the 19th century, and he is one of the major authors of the Romantic movement.He is the subject and hero of Jacques Offenbach's famous but fictional opera The Tales of Hoffmann, and the author of the novelette The Nutcracker and the Mouse King, on which the famous ballet The Nutcracker is based...

By: E. W. (Edward William) Cole (1832-1918)

Book cover Cole's Funny Picture Book No. 1

By: E.D.E.N. Southworth (1819-1899)

Book cover The Missing Bride

Prepare yourself for a journey, full of adventures and plot twists which will keep you guessing until the very end. This is psychological romance at its best. In the war of 1814, an American heiress falls in love with a British officer. This ill-fated marriage brings together a large group of interesting people who would never have met in other circumstances.

By: E.E. Smith (1890-1965)

Book cover The Vortex Blaster

Uncontrolled, terribly violent Atomic Vortices are slowly destroying civilization on every human planet throughout the galaxy. Nothing can contain or stop them despite the lensmen's best efforts until one destroys the home and family of "Storm" Cloud, brilliant atomic physicist. The tragedy triggers actions on his part that pit him one-on-one against the horrible vortices. Introducing "storm" Cloud as THE Vortex Blaster

By: E.E. “Doc” Smith (1890-1965)

Triplanetary by E.E. “Doc” Smith Triplanetary

“Doc” E.E. Smith pretty much invented the space opera genre, and Triplanetary is a good and well-known example. Physics, time, and politics never stand in the way of a plot that gallops ahead without letup. Having earned a PhD in chemical engineering, it’s understandable that the heroes of Smith’s story are all scientists. He didn’t want to be constrained by the limits of known science, however, so in his hands the electromagnetic spectrum becomes a raw material to be molded into ever-more amazing and lethal forms, and the speed of light is no bar to traveling through the interstellar void...

By: E.M. Berens

Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome by E.M. Berens Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

Silver footed, fair haired Thetis, Ares the God of War, Nike the Goddess of Victory, The Furies and The Muses, Zeus the presiding deity of the Universe and the magical, mysterious Olympus, are some of the amazing, mythical Greek and Roman deities you'll encounter in this book. Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome by EM Berens was originally intended for young readers. Written in an easy and light style, the author attempts to bring the pantheon of gods into a comprehensible format....

By: E.W. Howe (1853-1937)

The Mystery of the Locks by E.W. Howe The Mystery of the Locks

Davy's Bend was a dying, lonely, uncared for river town. So when a stranger showed up one day and bought the old unoccupied house called 'The Locks' one dreary day, the inhabitants of the town were naturally very curious about the stranger, and very curious about his reasons for buying the old house. The Locks had been known for years to display at nighttime a single light showing up in one room, and there was one room in the house which was strictly off-limits to anyone. What was the history behind...

By: Earl Derr Biggers (1884-1933)

The Agony Column by Earl Derr Biggers The Agony Column

English romantic adventure starring a young American in London and inspired by the personal ads (agony columns) in the London papers. In this treacherous tale of murder and intrigue young American Geoffrey West tracks a killer from the posh dining room of the Carlton Hotel to the opium dens of London’s Limehouse district in search of the truth and the heart of his true love only to find the culprit all too close to home. Earl Derr Biggers is better known as the author of numerous Charlie Chan novels. The Agony Column was released as a movie under the name Second Floor Mystery in 1930. While this movie was in production, its two stars, Loretta Young and Grant Withers, eloped.

By: Earle Ashley Walcott (1859-1931)

Blindfolded by Earle Ashley Walcott Blindfolded

Giles Dudley is called upon by his cousin Henry Wilton to assist him in San Francisco, but the reason for the summons is not at all clear. Dudley answers the summons, only to find himself immediately wrapped in the middle of mystery and intrigue, the roots and ends of which he is utterly unaware. He has been given to care for a mysterious young boy whom he hasn't even seen. His cousin has mysteriously disappeared. Dudley's role in the mystery has him convinced that as he goes about trying to assist his cousin with whatever it was he wanted to accomplish, he does so completely blindfolded.

By: Ebenezer Cobham Brewer (1810-1897)

Book cover Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol. 1 A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook

By: Eden Coybee

Book cover The Dumpy Books for Children; No. 7. A Flower Book

By: Eden Phillpotts (1862-1960)

Book cover The Grey Room

By: Edfrid A. Bingham

Book cover The Heart of Thunder Mountain

By: Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)

12 Creepy Tales by Edgar Allan Poe 12 Creepy Tales

From the master of the psychological horror genre comes this brilliant collection 12 Creepy Tales by Edgar Allan Poe. It features some of his classics like The Tell-Tale Heart, The Black Cat and The Cask of Amontillado which are supreme examples of his craft. The Black Cat is a truly horrifying story of a death-row confession of guilt by a serial killer. The much loved family cat becomes the agent of his destruction and inevitable descent into crime and madness. Another superb story is The Facts in the Case of M Valdemar...

The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe The Murders in the Rue Morgue

This story opens with a mother and daughter found brutally murdered inside a locked room in an upstairs apartment on a street in Paris. The police are baffled by both the ferocity of the crime and the lack of clues. Neighbors give conflicting evidence. Two friends are intrigued by the entire situation as reported in the newspapers. They decide to do a little investigating on their own. What they come up with is one of the most shocking and strangest of conclusions. The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe is perhaps the first modern detective tale, though similar stories by Voltaire and ETA Hoffman did appear a few decades earlier...

Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym by Edgar Allan Poe Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym

Published in 1838, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket is Poe’s only complete novel and concentrates on several sea adventures gone awry. The novel follows Arthur Gordon Pym, who finds himself in the center of gloomy occurrences on board numerous vessels, as his anticipated sea adventure takes a drastic shift in the wind. Shipwreck, starvation, mutiny, near death experiences and cannibalism are just some of the issues endured in the gripping, and at times gruesome novel. The adventure...

Two Poe Tales by Edgar Allan Poe Two Poe Tales

Edgar Allan Poe is best known for his famous short horror stories; however, horror is not the only genre in which he wrote. How To Write a Blackwood Article and its companion piece A Predicament are satirical works exploring the pieces of the formula generally seen in short horror stories (”articles”) found in the Scottish periodical “Blackwood’s Magazine” and the successful misapplication of said formula by – horrors! – a woman author! – respectively.

The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Raven Edition by Edgar Allan Poe The Works of Edgar Allan Poe, Raven Edition

This, the first of 5 volumes containing Poe's works, contains 8 of his short stories as well as reflections, critiques, and eulogies by others.

Book cover The Fall of the House of Usher

By: Edgar B. P. Darlington

Book cover The Circus Boys on the Plains : or, the Young Advance Agents Ahead of the Show
Book cover The Circus Boys on the Flying Rings : or, Making the Start in the Sawdust Life

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