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Books of Memoirs

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By: Evans, A. J. (1889-1960)

The Escaping Club by Evans, A. J. The Escaping Club

Described by some as one of the greatest escape books published. The Escaping Club recounts Evans' escape to Switzerland from a supposedly "escape-proof" German prison camp during World War I. After repatriation and rejoining the war, Evans again finds himself captured, this time first by Arabs and then by Turks. He again manages to escape. A detailed look at the trials faced by Allied POWs during World War I.

By: Ezra Meeker (1830-1928)

Ox-Team Days on the Oregon Trail by Ezra Meeker Ox-Team Days on the Oregon Trail

Ezra Meeker…was an early pioneer who traveled the Oregon Trail by ox cart as a young man. Beginning in his 70s, he worked tirelessly to memorialize the trail, repeatedly retracing the trip of his youth. This book is a memoir of those days.

By: Fa'iz El-Ghusein (1883-1968)

Martyred Armenia by Fa'iz El-Ghusein Martyred Armenia

This is a first hand account of the Armenian Genocide written by a Syrian who had been a Turkish official for three and a half years. His accounts tell of the worst of humanity, and also of the noblest. The noble include families who courageously support each other in the face of death, and Turks who refuse to follow orders to kill, knowing that they shall be executed themselves for their defiance.

By: Fanny Loviot

Book cover Lady's Captivity among Chinese Pirates in the Chinese Seas

This thrilling narrative recounts the true story of Fanny Loviot, a wealthy, young French girl who was kidnapped at sea. After setting sail for California in 1855, Fanny's boat was overtaken by Chinese pirates who held her hostage and demanded a ransom. This personal account follows her trying time in captivity, as well as her dramatic rescue by British authorities.

By: Father John Gerard (1564-1637)

Book cover During the Persecution: Autobiography of Father John Gerard

Fr. John Gerard was an English Jesuit priest who operated covertly in England during the Elizabethan era, during which the Catholic Church was subject to persecution. Gerard notably not only successfully hid from the English authorities for eight years before his capture but also endured extensive torture, escaped from the Tower of London, recovered and continued with his covert mission. After his escape to the Continent, he was instructed by his Jesuit superiors to write a book about his life...

By: Ferdinand de Lesseps (1805-1894)

Book cover History of the Suez Canal

A lively picture of the origin and completion of the Suez Canal and his architect, Vicomte de Lesseps. This is the translation of a lecture given before the Societe de Gens Lettres in Paris, in April 1870 by de Lesseps himself.

By: Ferdinand Ossendowski (1876-1945)

Beasts, Men and Gods by Ferdinand Ossendowski Beasts, Men and Gods

“Beasts, Men and Gods” is an account of an epic journey, filled with perils and narrow escapes, in the mold of “The Lord of the Rings.”The difference is: it’s all true.Ferdinand Ossendowski was a Pole who found himself in Siberia and on the losing side during the Bolshevik Revolution. To escape being rounded up and shot, he set out with a friend to reach the Pacific, there to take ship back to Europe. During his journey he fell in with dozens of other military men who shared the same objective… but nearly every one of them perished on the way...

By: Flavius Philostratus

Book cover The Life of Apollonius of Tyana

Apollonius of Tyana (ca. 40-120 AD) was a Greek Pythagorean philosopher and teacher. He hailed from the town of Tyana in the Roman province of Cappadocia in Asia Minor. His date of birth is a matter of conjecture as some say he was roughly a contemporary of Jesus.After Apollonius' death his name remained famous among philosophers and occultists. In a "novelistic invention" inserted in the Historia Augusta, Aurelian, at the siege of Tyana in 272, was said to have experienced a visionary dream in which Aurelian claimed to have seen Apollonius speak to him, beseeching him to spare the city of his birth...

By: Flora Sandes (1876-1956)

Book cover English Woman-Sergeant in the Serbian Army

Flora Sandes was the only British woman officially to serve as a soldier in World War I. Initially a St. John Ambulance volunteer, she traveled to Serbia, where, in the confusion of war, she was formally enrolled in the Serbian army. While the Serbian Army was regrouping in Corfu, Ms. Sandes returned to England to recuperate and publish these memoirs.

By: Florence A. Merriam (1863-1948)

A-Birding on a Bronco by Florence A. Merriam A-Birding on a Bronco

Florence Augusta Merriam Bailey (August 8, 1863 - September 22, 1948) was an American ornithologist and nature writer. She started observing bird behavior at a time when most bird study was based on collections and skins. By 1885, she began to write articles focusing on protecting birds. Her introduction of a birdwatching field guide, aimed at living birds, is considered the first in the tradition of modern bird guides. She wrote the first of these at the age of 26, initially as a series of notes in the Audubon Magazine and later as books. In "A-Birding on a Bronco," she writes an engaging memoir about her several trips to study birds on a ranch in California in the late 1800's.

By: Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939)

Book cover Joseph Conrad: A Personal Remembrance

Joseph Conrad was a Polish-British writer regarded as one of the greatest novelists to write in the English language. Though he did not speak English fluently until his twenties, he was a master prose stylist who brought a non-English sensibility into English literature. Conrad wrote stories and novels, many with a nautical setting, that depict trials of the human spirit in the midst of what he saw as an impassive, inscrutable universe. Conrad collaborated in some works with Ford Madox Ford. Ford was an English novelist, poet, critic and editor whose journals The English Review and The Transatlantic Review were instrumental in the development of early 20th-century English literature...

By: Forrest Crissey (1864-1943)

Book cover Tattlings of a Retired Politician

"The letters of Hon. William Bradley, Ex-Governor and former veteran of practical politics, written to his friend and protege Ned who is still busy 'carving a career back in the old state.'" This is a novel filled with humorous political anecdotes by the main character, the Honorable William Bradley, told for the benefit of his protege, Ned. It conveys a sense of the ironic and humorous side of politics in Washington and back in their home state.

By: Frances E. Willard (1839-1898)

Book cover Wheel Within A Wheel

Frances Willard was an influential campaigner and educator for social reforms, temperance and women's education, suffrage and empowerment, as shown in her motto "Do everything". She was a long-serving national president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and famous in many countries for her writings and speaking tours. This little book is a wryly humorous account of "How I Learned to Ride the Bicycle", something she achieved at the age of 53 and of which she was very proud! In it, she...

By: Frances M. A. Roe

Army Letters from an Officer's Wife, 1871-1888 by Frances M. A. Roe Army Letters from an Officer's Wife, 1871-1888

"There appeared from the bushes in front of me, and right in the path, two immense gray wolves . . . Rollo saw them and stopped instantly, giving deep sighs, preparing to snort, I knew . . . To give myself courage, I talked to the horse, slowly turning him around . . . when out of the bushes in front of us, there came a third wolf! The situation was not pleasant and without stopping to think, I said ‘Rollo, we must run him down - now do your best’ and taking a firm hold of the bridle, and bracing myself in the saddle, I struck the horse with my whip and gave an awful scream...

By: Frances Power Cobbe (1822-1904)

Book cover Life of Frances Power Cobbe as Told by Herself

Frances Power Cobbe was an important Irish-Anglo writer, suffragist, anti-vivisectionist, philosopher, and reformer of the mid to late 1800s. She is best known for her campaigns for women's rights , and against wife abuse and vivisection. She was the lifelong partner of Welsh sculptor Mary Lloyd. This autobiography was written very late in her life, and published shortly after her death. - Summary by Ciufi Galeazzi

By: Frances Ridley Havergal (1836-1879)

Book cover Kept for the Master's Use

The memoirs of Frances Ridley Havergal, a great missionary and hymn writer.

By: Frances Sheridan

Book cover Memoirs of Miss Sidney Bidulph

Sidney and Cecilia are best childhood friends who are forced to part for 5 years. In that interval, Sidney Bidulph - an undoubtedly good and dutiful woman - writes to her friend about everything: her marriage, her children, her other friendships and, above all, about her great love for Mr. Faulkland. In an amazing and unforgettable way, this book shows us that the road to happiness is not always clear - and that sometimes doing what seems to be right is not really the right thing to do. With Rachel's lovely reading, we see her - Sidney Bidulph - as she was meant to be, and as she really is.

By: Francis Archibald Bruton (1860-1929)

Three Accounts of Peterloo by Francis Archibald Bruton Three Accounts of Peterloo

A companion volume to F.A. Bruton's 'The Story of Peterloo', the full title of this short collection is 'Three Accounts of Peterloo by Eyewitnesses, Bishop Stanley, Lord Hylton, John Benjamin Smith with Bishop Stanley's Evidence at the Trial'. The three contemporary accounts, each with a short introduction by the editor, give different perspectives on the events of 16 August 1819, when a troop of Hussars accompanied by the local Yeomanry rode into a peaceful reform rally at St. Peter's Fields, Manchester, leaving 18 dead and more than 700 injured.

By: Francis Asbury (1745-1816)

Book cover Journal of Francis Asbury, Volume I

As one of the first two bishops of the Methodist church in America and one of the most well-known circuit riders during the spread of Methodism, Francis Asbury kept a journal of his travels and activities. His journal begins with his prayerful decision to come to America in 1771 and continues to December of 1815, a few months before his death. In the meantime, we travel with Rev. Asbury across the ocean, over mountains, through rivers, and up and down the whole length of the fledgling United States of America. - Summary by Devorah Allen

By: Francis Key Howard (1826-1872)

Fourteen Months in American Bastiles by Francis Key Howard Fourteen Months in American Bastiles

Francis Key Howard recounts in this book his life as a political prisoner of the United States. He points out that he was held captive at the same location where his grandfather was inspired to write the national anthem about the "land of the free," which makes a very stunning contrast. The sufferings that were imposed on him by the Union forces had the effect of solidifying his determination to resist unjust governmental dictates. (Introduction by Katie Riley)

By: François-René de Chateaubriand (1768-1848)

Book cover Memoirs of Chateaubriand 1768 to 1800

This is the first volume of Chateaubriand's Memoires d'Outre Tombe, in a Victorian translation. It covers the period from his birth, including the extraordinarily evocative childhood years and his travels in America, the source of some of his later writing, up to his return to France in 1800. Writer, politician and the father of French Romanticism, Chateaubriand lived close to the heart of the France's travails in the nineteenth century and engaged with them passionately. His frankness, fluency and the tumultuous times in which he lived make his Memoirs one of the enduring monuments of the art of autobiography. - Summary by Nicole Lee

Book cover Memoirs of Chateaubriand Volume II

Volume II of Chateaubriand's Memoirs from Beyond the Tomb, translated by Teixeira de Mattos. This volume covers the period from his return to France to fight, reluctantly, for the King, his early literary successes with many portraits of the great and the good, including Napoleon, through to his travels in the Near East in the first decade of the 19th century, all through with his characteristic blend of mordant wit and melancholy. - Summary by Nicole Lee

Book cover Memoirs of Chateaubriand Volume III

The third volume of Teixeira de Mattos' translation of Chateaubriand's Memoirs from Beyond the Tomb covers the spectacular fall, exile, and death of Napoleon, and is replete with the author's trenchant views on the some of the most significant figures of his era, tinged with his signature melancholy. - Summary by Nicole Lee

Book cover Memoirs of Chateaubriand Volume IV

After the extinction of Napoleon's comet on St Helena, Chateaubriand covers the Bourbon Restoration in this volume, meeting a dazzling array of literary and political figures, as his diplomatic career advances. - Summary by Nicole Lee

Book cover Memoirs of Chateaubriand Volume V

The memoirs of Chateaubriand continue in Volume 5, with the author, now a grand hommes des lettres, still in the thick of political events, telling his story with his trademark acerbity and melancholy, interspersed with extracts from his voluminous correspondence with the literary, intellectual and political stars of his age.

By: Frank Thomas Bullen (1857-1915)

Book cover Confessions of a Tradesman

Frank T. Bullen is best known for his books based on his adventures at sea. However, he had a life on shore as well. He first went to sea as a boy as a cabin boy. He there had many adventures as a hand on a whaling ship. He then came ashore and tried his hand at being a "Tradesman". This is that story and also tells how he became the well-known author he is now. It is a very interesting, enjoyable and entertaining depiction of the trials and tribulations he had in his life in 19th century London as a tradesman. - Summary by Wayne Cooke

By: Franz Liszt (1811-1886)

Book cover Life of Chopin

Chopin was a romantic era Polish composer. This work is a memoir by Liszt who knew Chopin both as man and artist. This memoir gives a unique understanding to the psychological character of the compositions of Chopin. It also offers Liszt's insight into some of Chopin's polonaises, especially the grand polonaise in F sharp minor. Liszt explains the strange emotion "ZAL" which is inclosed in his compositions. Then, presents a brief sketch on the lives of other great people in Chopin's circle. After that, Liszt discusses Chopin's fame and early life. Finally, Liszt gives a detailed account on Chopin's sufferings due to ill health and the unfortunate departure of the great composer.

By: Franz von Dingelstedt (1814-1881)

Book cover John Gutenberg, First Master Printer: His Acts and Most Remarkable Discourses and his Death

This is a brief sketch of the last years of the life of Johannes (John) Gutenberg, the man who invented the movable letter press. We join him in Mayence, where he lives in poverty. We get to know his enemies and his friends, and some information about why he isn't the rich man we'd expect him to be. This book was prepared and completed within two days by the volunteers at Distributed Proofreaders to mark their 15th anniversary with the 50,000th published book at Project Gutenberg. ( Claudia Salto)

By: Frederick Douglass (1818-1895)

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass

Frederick Douglass was born into slavery on a Maryland plantation. He faced hardship as a child, but later encountered owners who were relatively liberal and allowed him to learn to read, write and be in contact with freed slaves. At the age of 20, he escaped from the plantation and made his way to New York. Though he remained a fugitive, he married and changed his name to avoid being caught. He continued his education and became involved in the Abolitionist Movement. He began touring the country, speaking passionately about the unjust, cruel and inhuman practice of slavery...

By: Frederick Marryat (1792-1848)

Book cover Jacob Faithful

Rebelling against the career chosen for him by his wealthy family, Frederic Marryat joined the Royal Navy in 1806 at the age of 14. He first served as a midshipman in the 38-gun frigate "HMS Imperieuse" commanded by Lord Cochran, 10th Earl of Dundonald whose real life exploits were used by Marryat in his fiction and which formed the basis for other famous fictional characters like Horatio Hornblower and Jack Aubrey. Having survived more than 50 sea battles and attained the rank of Post Captain, he resigned from the Navy and devoted the rest of his life to writing, drawing a good deal on his distinguished career in the Navy and is now considered the Father of Modern Nautical Fiction...

By: Frederick Treves (1853-1923)

Book cover Elephant Man and other reminiscences

In 1884, Professor Treves saw Joseph Merrick in a shop across the road from the London Hospital. Being also a teacher at the University, he brought Merrick to the London Hospital as a teaching case, and Merrick lived there until his death in April 1890. This book of "reminiscences" includes the story of the "Elephant Man" as well as other interesting cases from Sir Treves' practice as a doctor.

By: Gen. George A. Custer (1839-1876)

My Life on the Plains by Gen. George A. Custer My Life on the Plains

George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 – June 25, 1876), one of the most mythologized figures in American history, was an United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars. He eventually met his fate in the battle of Little Big Horn in one of the most notable defeats of American armed forces.My Life on the Plains is an autobiographical first-hand account of the Indian Wars of 1867-1869, detailing the winter campaign of 1868 in which Custer led the 7th US cavalry against the Cheyenne Indians...


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