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By: United Nations

Book cover United Nations Agreements

The Charter of the United Nations signed at San Francisco on 26 June 1945 is the constituent treaty of the United Nations. It is as well one of the constitutional texts of the International Court of Justice which was brought into being by the Charter. This recording contains: UN Charter Statute of the International Criminal Court Millennium Declarations

By: Columbia Accident Investigation Board

Book cover Columbia Accident Investigation Board Final Report, Volume 1

In 1981, Columbia became the first spacecraft of its type to fly in Earth orbit and successfully completed 27 missions over more than two decades. During the STS-107 mission, Columbia and its crew traveled more than six million miles in 16 days. The Orbiterʼs destruction, just 16 minutes before scheduled touchdown, shows that space flight is still far from routine. It involves a substantial element of risk, which must be recognized, but never accepted with resignation. The seven Columbia astronauts believed that the risk was worth the reward...

By: Samuel Gordon (1871-1927)

Book cover Sons of the Covenant: A Tale of London Jewry

Born in London's poverty-stricken and heavily Jewish East End, the Lipcott boys create their own successes in life and love. The brothers' commitment to improving the lives of working class people leads them to concoct The Scheme to help both the residents of their former neighbourhood and the Jewish people as a whole. The author stresses the responsibility of middle class Jews toward the Jewish poor. Consequently, this 1900 story has its preachy moments as well as some essentialised speculations about Jewish history and character...

By: Ottilie Wildermuth (1817-1877)

Book cover Queen

Maggie is an orphan who depends on the charity of the farmer she lives with. She tries to be cheerful and helpful to everyone where she is. However, Maggie dreams of being a queen. But how can a poor orphan ever become anything other than what she is?

By: Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859)

Book cover Cosmos: A Sketch of a Physical Description of The Universe: Introduction

Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von Humboldt was a Prussian geographer, naturalist, explorer, and influential proponent of romantic philosophy. Many consider him to be the last of the great polymaths. After his death in 1859, the scientific world began to divide into separate disciplines, each with its own knowledgeable but narrowly defined experts. Humboldt’s mind encompassed all that was then known of nature in one great whole. He could well be considered the father of modern ecology and earth studies...

By: Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments

Book cover Final Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments

Researchers in the United States have performed thousands of human radiation experiments to determine the effects of atomic radiation and radioactive contamination on the human body. Most of these tests were performed, funded, or supervised by the United States military, Atomic Energy Commission, or various other U.S. federal government agencies. The experiments included a wide array of studies, involving things like feeding radioactive food to mentally disabled children, deliberately releasing radioactive chemicals over U...

By: Christopher Morley (1890-1957)

Book cover Shandygaff

A number of most agreeable Inquirendoes upon Life & Letters, interspersed with Short Stories & Skits, the whole most Diverting to the Reader. SHANDYGAFF: a very refreshing drink, being a mixture of bitter ale or beer and ginger-beer, commonly drunk by the lower classes in England, and by strolling tinkers, low church parsons, newspaper men, journalists, and prizefighters. Said to have been invented by Henry VIII as a solace for his matrimonial difficulties. It is believed that a continual bibbing of shandygaff saps the will, the nerves, the resolution, and the finer faculties, but there are those who will abide no other tipple...

By: Allen H. Godbey (1864-1948)

Book cover Great Disasters and Horrors in the World's History

"Mankind is constantly astonished by reports of mishaps and disasters of manifold character, when there is seldom room for astonishment. A large proportion of the calamities reported from day to day are directly due to the haste, greed, and heedlessness of man himself, and need no comment. But there is a large class of disasters, due solely to meteorological or geological conditions, which surpass all others in magnitude and appalling destruction. In such cases men insist on prating about “mysterious visitations,” as though these occurrences were subject to the dominion of no law. To an examination of such is this book devoted." From the preface.

By: Eliza Armstrong

Book cover Teacup Club (Dramatic Reading)

The Teacup Club is formed when Dorothy decides to found an intellectual club of her own - to teach her fiance a lesson! The club’s discussion topics includes Theosophy, Politics and Women in Legislature. The club’s unofficial topics include Emily’s new dress, man-flu and the great mystery of the missing chafing-dish. A witty drama and a comedy of manners, secrets and politics . - Summary by Elizabby Cast List: Cast Narrator: Beth Thomas Evelyn: Jennifer Fournier Emily: Leanne Yau Dorothy: KHand Frances: Beth Thomas Elise: Lydia Marion: Vicki Hibbins Catharine: Michele Eaton Edited by: Michele Eaton and linny Proof listeners: Michele Eaton, Beth Thomas

By: E. M. Delafield (1890-1943)

Book cover Heel of Achilles

After a difficult childhood, Lydia Raymond, a lower middle class girl, decides to explore her own individuality and climbs the social ladder. Yet, like everything in life, this has a price. This book tells about her childhood, her quest to find herself, and her relationship with her daughter, Jane. This is a fairytale turned upside down. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: Rolf Boldrewood (1826-1915)

Book cover Plain Living

Seemingly down-on-his-luck Australian sheep rancher and orchard grower kindly teaches his loving family the value of money through 'plain living'. Fellow fans of Jon Cleary's "The Sundowners", set a generation later, may enjoy this. - Summary by Matt Pierard

By: Steele Rudd (1868-1935)

Book cover Dad's Trip to Brisbane (from Our New Selection)

Chapters XV through XIX of "Our New Selection" "The wheat was in, and Dad decided to take a trip to Brisbane. For seven or eight years he had been thinking of that trip, but something or other always came to prevent his going. According to Dad himself, the farm would suffer if he went away for a month; there would be no one to look after it, no one to manage. According to us there would be no one to look on while the cows were being milked; no one to stand in the paddock all day while the hay was...

By: Various

Book cover Mentor 1

The Mentor Association was established to increase interest and knowledge among the public in the areas of art, literature, science, nature, history and travel. The association published a magazine twice monthly, each dealing with a different topic and often written by a recognized authority of the day. They were easy to read, visually appealing and affordable. This collection includes selections from issues dating from 1913-1919. - Summary by Lynne Thompson

By: Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi (1869-1948)

Book cover Guide to Health

Mahatma Gandhi, known today as a fascinating political leader and pacifist, also considered himself "something of an authority on matters of Health and Disease as well. Very few of us perhaps are aware that he is the author of quite an original little Health-book in Gujarati. [...] His views are of course radically different from the ordinary views that find expression in the pages of such books; in many cases, indeed, his doctrines must be pronounced revolutionary, and will doubtless be regarded by a certain class of readers as wholly impracticable...

By: Carroll Watson Rankin (1864-1945)

Book cover Adopting of Rosa Marie

In this charming girl's book we meet again the four chums of Dandelion Cottage. Their friendship knit closer than ever by their summer at playing house, the girls enlarge their activity by mothering a pretty little Indian baby. "Those who have read Dandelion Cottage will need no urge to follow further. . . . A lovable group of four children, happily not perfect, but full of girlish plans and pranks and a delightful sense of humor." - Summary from the book

By: Fleming Mant Sandwith (1853-1918)

Book cover Sleeping Sickness

In the twenty-first century sleeping sickness is still a life-threatening disease of adults and children and a hazard to tourists in East African game parks.The protozoan parasite is transmitted by the tsetse fly, a buzzing insect with reddish eyes and a large biting proboscis. In 1912, when this short monograph was written, physicians of the British Empire understood that trans-continental expeditions manned by infected African porters, had set off an epidemic of sleeping sickness that had claimed half a million lives...

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 044

Nineteen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include wives, widows, and women scorned--the "Baby Doe Tabor" scandal, the trials of literary marriages, and colonial women; history--Wounded Knee, the Underground Railroad, Edward Bellamy's "nationalism," and English railroads; inspiring places--the Alhambra and Squaw Rock; invention--the marine chronometer; and essays on the Constitution, the natural equality of men, old age, the consolation of reading, and on the fantastic imagination...

By: William Nelson Taft

Book cover On Secret Service

Detective-Mystery stories based on real cases solved by government agents. Created initially in 1865, the U.S. Secret Service continued to expand over the years, particularly following the assassination of President McKinley in 1901. The episodes in this compilation are comprised of authentic stories, dramatized, while remaining true to the actual incidences. - Summary by Roger Melin

By: Jacob A. Riis (1849-1914)

Book cover Out of Mulberry Street

These riveting accounts by Jacob A. Riis are from the late 19th century, when lower Manhattan was teeming with struggling, near-starving immigrants crammed into wretched fire-prone tenements. Riis writes compassionately of these people who were nevertheless incredibly resilient and ever aspiring to a better life; of children, lovers, parents, policemen and firemen; of moments of joy, holidays, tragedies, and much more. –Lee Smalley “Since I wrote ‘How the Other Half Lives’ I have been asked many times upon what basis of experience, of fact, I built that account of life in New York tenements...

By: Robert G. Ingersoll (1833-1899)

Book cover Eulogies

From Volume 12 of the Dresden Edition of The Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, entitled Miscellany, this audio book delivers the final chapters, 21 stirring tributes delivered by Colonel Ingersoll at the funerals or grave sides of, or published, of persons he greatly admired. Included are George Jacob Holyoake, Benjamin W. Parker, Ebon C. Ingersoll, Rev. Alexander Clark, John G. Mills, Elizur Wright, Mrs. Ida Whiting Knowles, Henry Ward Beecher, Roscoe Conkling, Richard H. Whiting, Courtlandt Palmer, Mrs. Mary H. Fiske, Horace Seaver, Lawrence Barrett, Walt Whitman, Philo D. Beckwith, Aton Seidl, Dr. Thomas Seton Robertson, Thomas Corwin, Isaac H. Bailey, and Harrison G. Fiske.

By: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (1797-1851)

Book cover Lodore

The author of Frankenstein returns with her take on an Austen novel. The mother is proud, the father has many vices, yet the aristocratic name must be kept. Even more so when lord Lodore dies. His wife and daughter find themselves without protection. This novel is conserned with gender equality, education and social justice. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 045

Eighteen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include ancient Greek thinkers--Parmenides, Demosthenes, Euclid; William Lloyd Garrison and the National Anti-Slavery Convention; 19th and 20th century philosophers, sociologists, theologians and essayists--Bertrand Russell, Walter Rauschenbusch, Kierkegaard, N.F.S. Brundtvig, Frederik Sibbern, Hans Lassen Martensen, Oscar Wilde; science and invention--sunspots, paper making, aviation; and the shipwreck adventures of Alexander Selkirk, the real Robinson Crusoe...

By: Georgene Faulkner (1873-1958)

Book cover White Elephant And Other Tales from Old India Retold

This book is a collection of short stories from India. - Summary by sid

By: Herbert Francis Peyser (1886-1953)

Book cover Hector Berlioz; A Romantic Tragedy

How much more futile is it to attempt on the minuscule scale of the following tiny, if rambling, pamphlet to touch upon even a thousandth of those achievements and unremitting conflicts which entered into the texture of this master’s agitated and inharmonious life! Actually, it aims to do no more than contribute a mite toward a larger interest in the writings and the great mass of insufficiently discovered compositions of a Romanticist whose labors are still surprisingly unrecognized art works of the future.

By: William Marcet (1828-1900)

Book cover On chronic alcoholic intoxication : with an inquiry into the influence of the abuse of alcohol as a predisposing cause of disease

Physician William Marcet treated numerous cases of acute alcoholism and chronic alcoholism. He suggests gastrointestinal disease, gout and rheumatism are diseases associated with chronic alcoholism and might either be the cause or the result. Many of his patients complaining of gout, rheumatism, giddiness, sleeplessness, sore stomach, ringing in the ears, flashing specks of light, etc were in fact suffering from chronic alcoholism from recent drinking or days long gone and did not know it. He also discusses cases of nervous conditions that he treated with Oxide of Zinc, saying that the patient benefited by increased sleep and that there were no evil results...

By: Various

Book cover Letters from Victorian Pioneers

A series of letters on the early occupation of the colony, the Aborigines, etc addressed by Victorian pioneers to his Excellency Charles Joseph La Trobe Esq. , Lieutenant-Governor of the Colony of Victoria in response to a circular letter sent by him to a number of early settlers dated 29th July 1853. - It cannot be claimed for these papers that they are infallible records of our early history at every point. , The last section ends with lists of Aboriginal words and phrases as were collected by a lady...

By: Robert J. Braidwood (1907-2003)

Book cover Prehistoric Men

This little book, first published in 1948, is part of the Chicago Natural History Popular History series that explains difficult subjects in ways and terms we all can understand. It was published at a time in Anthropology when exciting things like carbon dating were first being used and refined. "Prehistory means the time before written history began. Actually, more than 99 per cent of man’s story is prehistory. Man is at least half a million years old, but he did not begin to write history until about 5,000 years ago...

By: International Committee of the Red Cross

Book cover Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949

"This Convention represents the fourth updated version of the Geneva Convention on the wounded and sick following those adopted in 1864, 1906 and 1929. It contains 64 articles. These provide protection for the wounded and sick, but also for medical and religious personnel, medical units and medical transports. The Convention also recognizes the distinctive emblems. It has two annexes containing a draft agreement relating to hospital zones and a model identity card for medical and religious personnel." - Summary by International Committee of the Red Cross Please note, this recording DOESN'T include the 3 protocols.

By: E. Luscomb Haskell

Book cover Life of Jesse Harding Pomeroy

"The Life of Jesse Harding Pomeroy: The Most Remarkable Case in the History of Crime or Criminal Law" by E. Luscomb Haskell was published in Boston, Massachusetts in 1892 by the Harvard Law School Library, and is part of "The Making of the Modern Law, Legal Treatises, 1800-1926" series. Remarkable insight into the life of Pomeroy prior to, during, and following the crimes for which he was sentenced to life imprisonment at the tender age of 14, this is an excellent complement to Pomeroy's "autobiography" which was published immediately following his trial in 1874...

By: J. M. Barrie (1860-1937)

Book cover Tommy and Grizel

This book continues Sentimental Tommy, also in the catalogue. Tommy grows up and marries Grizel. But life is not only roses and rainbows. This book has all the elements of a good love story, but it is also a book about growing up and finding out your distinct voice in the world. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: Sir William Osler (1849-1919)

Book cover Alabama Student And Other Biographical Essays

Here are thirteen biographical sketches of physicians penned by one of the founders of modern medicine, William Osler, published in 1908. "Sir William Osler, one of the best-loved and most influential teachers of his time, was born in Canada in 1849…. Wherever he worked his gifted and unique personality was a center of inspiration… one would like to see his honorable place as a man of letters more generally understood. His generous wisdom and infectious enthusiasm are delightfully expressed in his collected writings…...

By: Eliza Haywood

Book cover History of Miss Betsy Thoughtless, Vol. 4

Betsy Thoughtless is about an intelligent and strong-willed woman who marries under pressure from the society in which she lives. Betsy learns that sometimes giving way to the role of women within a marriage can at times be fulfilling. This is the fourth and final volume in this series. Does she get her man you will have to listen and find out.

By: Mary Rhodes Waring Henagan

Book cover Two Diaries From Middle St. John's, Berkeley, South Carolina, February - May, 1865

Two diaries from Middle St. John’s, Berkeley, South Carolina, February – May, 1865. Journals kept by Miss Susan R. Jervey and Miss Charlotte St. Julien Ravenel, at Northampton and Poooshee Plantations, and reminiscences of Mrs. Henagan. With two contemporary reports from Federal officials. Published by the St. John’s Hunting Club, Middle St. Johns, Berkeley, South Carolina, 1921. - Summary by Book title and david wales

By: Annie Fellows Johnston (1863-1931)

Book cover Little Colonel's Knight Comes Riding

In the previous book in this series, Lloyd was the maid of honor, but now it will be the Little Colonel's turn to be the bride. But who will be the groom? Will it be one of our old friends from previous books such as Malcolm MacIntyre, Rob Moore, Alex Shelby, Phil Tremont, or Jack Ware . . .or perhaps a new Knight that comes riding!

By: United States Government

Book cover United States Constitution and Amendments

The Constitution is the charter of government and the supreme law of the United States of America. It was signed by delegates to the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on September 17, 1787. The first 10 amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, were ratified together in 1791. Amendments 11 through 27 were ratified separately from 1795 through 1992.

By: Bernard Le Bovier de Fontenelle (1657-1757)

Book cover Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds

This book is a popular science book written in the late 1600s. It is written as a series of conversations between a gallant philosopher and a countess, while walking in her garden and gazing at the stars. The philosopher explains the heliocentric model of the solar system and also muses on the possibility of extraterrestrial life. While it explains the heliocentric model, unlike other astronomy works of the time, it did not attract the attention of the Church.

By: Rosa Campbell Praed (1852-1935)

Book cover Policy and Passion

"Policy and Passion, a Novel of Australian Life" tells the story about a father and daughter, torn between the policy of the country in which they live and the passions both have. The father, Thomas, is a rising politician until his love for a married woman changes the game while the daughter, Honora, falls in love with an English nobleman. But this is not only a love story. This novel tells about the early days of Australia, and tells the story of a whole community. It receives scholarly attention as a work about colonialism. - Summary by Stav Nisser

By: Margaret Sidney (1844-1924)

Book cover Stories Polly Pepper Told to the Five Little Peppers in the Little Brown House

Polly Pepper loves to tell stories, but there just isn't enough room in the other books to include her stories! So, since "the author has received from mothers and other persons interested in the Pepper Family, so many requests for the Stories told by Polly Pepper ... this initial volume of Polly’s earlier stories has been prepared in obedience to these requests" . So curl up at Polly's feet, in front of the warm fire, and enjoy the Stories Polly Pepper Told to the Five Little Peppers in the Little Brown House! - Summary by Rachel

By: Henry C. Barkley (1837-1903)

Book cover Studies in the Art of Rat-Catching

This book is often described as an instruction manual on the subject of rat-catching. It does indeed contain a good deal about rats, ferrets and dogs, but it is much more than that. Barkley fills the book with humour, sharp observation, and his sheer joy of living in the countryside. The framework of the book is indeed a course by fictional rat-catcher Bob Joy, who suggests that rat-catching might be a suitable alternative career for boys at Eton, Harrow and the other major English public schools...

By: Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924)

Book cover Carpenter's Geographical Reader: North America

The purpose of this book is to give to its readers a living knowledge of some of the wonders of the country and continent in which they live. Upon a personally conducted tour they are taken by the author through the most characteristic parts of the North American continent. They travel through the United States, British America, Mexico, and Central America, studying the most interesting features of life and work among the people of each country, learning how they are governed, and what they do in order to live. Much information is also given concerning the natural resources and the physical features of the countries visited.

By: Elizabeth Bisland (1861-1929)

Book cover In Seven Stages: A Flying Trip Around the World by Elizabeth Bisland

In November 1889, the New York World announced that it was sending its reporter Nellie Bly around the world, in a bid to beat Phileas Fogg's fictitious 80-day journey in Jules Verne's novel Around the World in Eighty Days. Catching wind of this publicity stunt, John Brisben Walker, who had just purchased the three-year-old and still-fledging Cosmopolitan, decided to dispatch Bisland on her own journey.] Six hours after being recruited, Bisland departed westward from New York. Meanwhile, Bly left on a steamer headed to Europe, both on the same day—November 14, 1889...

By: James H. Collins (1873-1957)

Book cover Great Taxicab Robbery

In 1912, $25,000 was stolen during a bank transfer in New York City in broad daylight. In what may appear astonishing in today's world, the transfer occurred in a New York City taxicab. This factual account brings true crime of the early twentieth century to life. The various methods used by the detectives and police in their attempts to solve the mystery behind the robbery, and hopefully bring the thieves to justice, makes for great reading, particularly when one considers the fact that the accounts occurred over a century ago, and are quite authentic...

By: Various

Book cover Christmas Miscellany

A selection of eight short works, chapters, or poems about Christmas. - Summary by david wales

By: James W. Donovan

Book cover Don't Marry

This book doesn't advise against marriage but just offers advice on the errors some people can make who make the wrong choice when entering into so long a contract. - Summary by Michele Eaton

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 047

Eighteen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include philosophy and thought -- Plato, Aristotle, Leonhard Euler, Henri Amiel, and the French Rights of Man; adventure and mystery -- the ascent of Aconcagua and the mystery ship Mary Celeste; science -- a new comet and lichen dyes; portraits of the seasons by Lucy Maud Montgomery: biographies of Charles Dickens and Clara and Robert Schuman; a history of the Transcendental utopia Fruitlands by Louisa May Alcott, and an essay on reading by Isaac Disraeli. summary by Sue Anderson

By: Mary Edwards Walker (1832-1919)

Book cover Unmasked, or the Science of Immorality. To Gentlemen

Mary Edwards Walker was a physician and surgeon who served in the Civil War. An abolitionist, prohibitionist, and cross-dressing leader of the women's dress reform movement, she published this lively sex manual in 1878. It is a curious blend of useful information and Victorian sexual mythology, at once puritanical and explicit.

By: Edward Jenner (1749-1823)

Book cover An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of the Variolae Vaccinae

This collection of three publications details Edward Jenner's investigations into the connection between smallpox and coxpox, and the creation of the smallpox vaccine, the world's first vaccine. - Summary by Jordan

By: Various

Book cover Why do we need a public library?

Internet Archive, which hosts our audio books, is in the midst of their annual fund-raising. They have also begun a drive to provide a mirror site in Canada to ensure IA's availability to all users. The IA is a vast library with millions of public domain books, audio, film, radio, and other media. They also maintain an open library of copyrighted books one can 'check out' by becoming a member with a virtual library card. This collection is devoted to the concept of why we need a public library, the title taken from an essay by Chalmers Hadley, which will be the first entry in this audio book...

By: Zorro A. Bradley

Book cover Canyon de Chelly; The Story of its Ruins and People

A 1973 U.S. government publication describing the history and physical characteristics of this Arizona national monument within the boundaries of the Navajo Nation. - Summary by david wales

By: Albert Keim (1876-1947)

Book cover Louis Pasteur

Louis Pasteur famously said, "In the fields of observation chance favors only the prepared mind." Pasteur brought to the study of chemistry, microbiology, and applied immunology, a mind open, innovative, and insightful. Born of peasant stock in the French Jura, he worked with dogged determination all his life and often in the face of strenuous opposition. Through an unbroken succession of rigorously designed and meticulously performed experiments, Pasteur developed veterinary vaccines and halted grievous losses in the French wine, silk, and dairy industries...

By: Unknown

Book cover Mabel Ross, the Sewing Girl

Orphaned Mabel struggles to raise her sisters by working as a sewing girl for long hours and low wages. She meets her challenges with a calm steady faith while her younger sister chafes against the injustice of their lot in life. She is determined to uncover the mystery she thinks is lurking behind their misfortune. This book will appeal to those who love intimate family dramas, light mysteries, scathing social commentaries, or sewing machines!

By: Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896)

Book cover Palmetto Leaves

After the Civil War, Harriet and her husband Charles bought an Orange Plantation in Mandarin, on the upper east coast of Florida, where they lived during the winter months. Over the years they expanded their cottage to accommodate many guests . They opened schools to educate and churches to care for the recently freed negros pouring into Florida seeking refuge and opportunity. These charming essays, each describing a largely undeveloped rural land, became one of the first travel guides written about Florida and stimulated the first boom of tourism and residential development to that area...

By: Oliver Optic (1822-1897)

Book cover Watch and Wait; The Young Fugitives

One soft summer evening, when Woodville was crowned with the glory and beauty of the joyous season, three strangers presented themselves before the Grant family, and asked for counsel and assistance. The party consisted of two boys and a girl, and they belonged to that people which the traditions of the past have made the "despised race;" but the girl was whiter and fairer than many a proud belle who would have scorned her in any other capacity than that of a servant; and one of the boys was very nearly white, while the other was as black as ebony undefiled...

By: John Kendrick Bangs (1862-1922)

Book cover Peeps at People - Being Certain Papers from the Writings of Anne Warrington Witherup

Written by a fictitious first-person narrator, this book puts a humorous spin on encounters with several famous people of the time. "I set forth from my office in London upon my pilgrimage to the shrines of the world's illustrious. Readers everywhere are interested in the home life of men who have made themselves factors in art, science, letters, and history, and to these people I was commissioned to go." -- Summary by TriciaG and from the book.

By: Dr. Benjamin Rush (1746-1813)

Book cover Inquiry into the Effects of Ardent Spirits upon the Human Body and Mind, with an Account of the Means of Preventing, and of the Remedies for Curing Them

Written when the United States extended only to the Mississippi River, by one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, this short work explores the physical, social, and mental effects of distilled liquors; the classes of people prone to intoxication by them; suggested drinks to use instead of them; and remedies for intoxication and for their habitual use. He takes a medical view of alcoholism, exploring the physical causes rather than blaming moral failure as the cause. Alcoholic drinks that are not distilled are viewed as wholesome drinks, and opium is suggested for pain as being without bad effects or addictive qualities.

By: United States Department of Commerce

Book cover Report of the Airship ''Hindenburg'' Accident Investigation

“Oh my!”-Herbert O. Morrison, WLS News, ChicagoThursday, 6 May, 1937: It is early evening at a remote airport in central New Jersey. It’s starting to rain again. Suddenly, much to the surprise of the dozens of spectators gathered below, a gigantic diesel powered balloon blows up as it tries to land after crossing the ocean from Germany. In less time than it takes to read this summary, this proud machine, the quintessence of aerostatic technology, is re-forged forever into a twisted, smoking metaphor...

By: Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924)

Book cover Carpenter's Geographical Reader: South America

In this book the children are taken by the author upon a personally conducted tour through the most characteristic parts of the South American continent. The book will, it is believed, aid in putting flesh and blood on the bones of the geographies, and will give a living interest to geographical study.

By: Various

Book cover Mentor 2

The Mentor Association was established to increase interest and knowledge among the public in the areas of art, literature, science, nature, history and travel. The association published a magazine twice monthly, each dealing with a different topic and often written by a recognized authority of the day. They were easy to read, visually appealing and affordable. This collection includes selections from issues dating from 1913-1919. - Summary by Lynne Thompson

By: François Fénelon (1651-1715)

Book cover Lives of the Ancient Philosophers

François Fénelon became a priest in 1675, Archbishop of Paris in 1679, was spiritual advisor to Madame Guyon, and was appointed tutor to Louis, Duke of Burgundy by Louis XIV in 1689. He wrote Dialogues of the Dead, and The Lives of the Ancient Philosophers as well as The Adventures of Telemachus expressly for his instruction. Fenelon wrote against the Jansenists and in favor of the Jesuits. He is also known for his Christian Perfection: Devotional Reflections on the Christian Life and Treatise on the Education of Girls.. - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Anne Isabella Thackeray Ritchie (1837-1919)

Book cover Mrs. Dymond

Susanna Holcombe, a very sensitive and free spirited young lady, tries to fit in to society. But it is very hard for a Victorian woman to carve her own path, and she is almost forced to marry colonel Dymond. This book tells about her trials and tribulations. Can she find her place at last? Perfect for fans of Mary Elizabeth Braddon and Anthony Trollope, and those who want a Jane Austen novel with a twist. Anne Isabella Thackeray Ritchie was the eldest daughter of William Makepeace Thackeray, author of Vanity Fair. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 048

Fifteen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include philosophy and thought--Phtah-Hotep, Petrarch, Diderot, Bertrand Russell, and the Weymouth New Testament; adventure and travel--a survival story by Mark Twain and a woman's sojourn in Saltillo, Mexico; immigration and war--Benjamin Franklin on the assimilation of German speakers, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, the League of Nations, and an essay on potatoes and war; geology--on the origins of chalk; a critique of one-act plays, a biography of H...

By: J. M. Barrie (1860-1937)

Book cover Little Minister

Before "Peter Pan" came "The Little Minister", J.M. Barrie's first published novel. This is not a children's book, but reflections on life in a remote village in Scotland. The story opens with the minister and his mother moving into the village of Thrums, where the minister must earn the respect of the villagers, threading his way through class differences, politics and suspicion of the travelling gypsies. But what would happen if the newly respectable minister of Thrums fell in love with a gypsy woman? And how will her secret impact upon them all?

By: Leslie Buswell (1890-1964)

Book cover With The American Ambulance Field Service In France; Personal Letters Of A Driver At The Front

This 1915 publication collects letters written by a driver for the American ambulance service. The incidents they relate occurred before the entrance of the United States into World War I as a combatant. “These letters, according to ordinary ethics in such matters, should not, perhaps, be published. They were merely intended as tributes of friendship and remembrance. Casually written — in pencil often — at moments between duties, with no thought of their being destined to any further purpose than that distance and absence might count a little less through the pictures they would give of a day's work far away.” - Summary by Book Preface and David Wales

By: Unknown

Book cover Tales Of The Royal Irish Constabulary

The Royal Irish Constabulary was the armed police force of the United Kingdom in Ireland from the early nineteenth century until 1922. About seventy-five percent of the RIC were Roman Catholic and about twenty-five percent were of various Protestant denominations, the Catholics mainly constables and the Protestants officers. In consequence of the Anglo-Irish Treaty, the RIC was disbanded in 1922 and was replaced by the Garda Síochána in the Irish Free State and the Royal Ulster Constabulary in Northern Ireland...

By: Rodris Roth (1931-2000)

Book cover Tea Drinking In 18th-Century America: Its Etiquette And Equipage

The title of this 1961 Smithsonian Institution bulletin says it all. “In 18th-century America, the pleasant practice of taking tea at home was an established social custom with a recognized code of manners and distinctive furnishings. Pride was taken in a correct and fashionable tea table whose equipage included much more than teapot, cups, and saucers. It was usually the duty of the mistress to make and pour the tea; and it was the duty of the guests to be adept at handling a teacup and saucer and to provide social ‘chitchat...

By: Helen Hill

Book cover Charlie and His Kitten Topsy

A darling story of little Charlie and his adventures with cats and kittens and how he became many things. Also how the kitten Topsy, unhappy with being a kitten and having his face washed, tries different life styles with different animals but finally makes the right choice. - Summary by Phil Chenevert

By: Jean Webster (1876-1916)

Book cover Wheat Princess

Marcia Copley, an American Heiress, comes to Rome. Typically for the period, she may want to attract an aristocrat. He brings the title, she brings the money to support it. Her adventures in Rome are different than she anticipated. Rich and poor live side by side, and the author does her best to describe both walks of life vividly and truthfully. Jean Webster is the author of Daddy Long Legs and Dear Enemy. This particular novel would also please fans of Henry James and George Gissing. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: Ellen Thorneycroft Fowler (1860-1929)

Book cover Concerning Isabel Carnaby

Isabel Carnaby returns from India. She starts looking for a place in upper class British society. At the begining, people are sceptical of her because she is an orphan. But she will surprise everybody. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: Frank G. Carpenter (1855-1924)

Book cover Carpenter's Geographical Reader: Europe

The book tries to give its young readers a living knowledge of Europe. The author conducts tours through various parts of Europe giving a glimpse of the people and their lives and livelihoods. He includes as well information on the natural resources and physical geography of those many countries. Summary by BettyB and preface.

By: Rosanna Eleanor Leprohon (1829-1879)

Book cover Armand Durand

Armand Durand, published in 1868, was written by Rosanna Leprohon, an English-speaker with an insider’s knowledge of French Canada, thanks to her Montreal education and marriage to a man from an old Québécois family. Paul Durand, a prosperous Québécois farmer, marries in quick succession two very different wives, and fathers two very different sons. The first son, Armand, delicate and bookish, is destined for a legal career in the city; the second, Paul Junior, tougher and down-to-earth, continues life on the farm...

By: John Farrar (1896-1974)

Book cover Bookman, March 1921

This precursor to The New Yorker magazine features several Algonquin Roundtable regulars, including Broun, Woolcott, and Morley. Editor is John C. Farrar, an American editor, writer and publisher. Farrar founded two publishing companies — Farrar & Rinehart and Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 049

Sixteen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include science and natural history--carnivorous plants, tadpoles, tent caterpillars, flights of birds, horse training, dogs, children's sign language, trees in winter, and night noises in the woods; philosophy--Roger Bacon and Nicholas of Cusa; satire and literary criticism--the movies as "stupies," bustles, and facetious plots for short stories by Dorothy Parker; also an appraisal of Conrad Aiken's poetry, and an intimate look at Abraham Lincoln's early life in Illinois.

By: Robert Vashon Rogers (1843-1911)

Book cover Law and Medical Men

The idea that in the library of nearly every prac­ti­tion­er in the pro­fes­sions of both Physic and Law there has been for some time a small gap among the books, which could be filled by a little work like this now submitted, has induced the author to prepare and publish the following pages. While it is hoped that this little work will prove of use to the members of the Legal and Medical Professions, it is intended to be suggestive rather than exhaustive—a primer not an encyclopædia; and...

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 050

Seventeen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include science and natural history--the donkey, forestry, grape vines, astronomy, historian Agnes Mary Clerke, and Greek botanist Theophrastus ; philosophy-- Nicholas of Cusa and Emmanuel Kant; Sommerset Maugham's reminiscences of Spain; Joseph Conrad's sea stories; an encounter with a long-ago companion who has contracted leprosy ; working in the dead-letter office; a dinner the painter Benjamin Hayden hosted for Wordsworth, Keats, and Charles Lamb; a portrait of Margaret Fuller by R...

By: Harvey Jerrold O'Higgins (1876-1929)

Book cover Smoke Eaters

This book vividly brings to life the unimaginable risks of fire-fighting and the bravery and personal interactions of Captain Meaghan and the crew of Hook & Ladder Company No. 0 in New York City. A 1905 review in the New York Times notes: “’The Smoke-Eaters’…is one of those rare good treats that fall to the reviewer’s lot…. There is enough humor and pathos of a grim and rugged sort, enough tense life and excitement and thrilling heroism to make a dozen...of the ordinary run of books, and it is all told with a straightforward simplicity that well accords with the single-hearted devotion to duty of the men who...

By: Jean Craighead George (1919-2012)

Book cover Everglades Wildguide

This is a United States National Parks guidebook written by a popular young people's nature writer, Jean Craighead George. It covers the Everglades in detail, from its mangrove swamps to its sawgrass prairies.

By: S.E. Kiser (1862-1942)

Book cover Father

A tribute to fatherhood by a little known author, - Summary by David Lawrence

By: Johanna Spyri (1827-1901)

Book cover Little Miss Grasshopper

The Feland family go on a holiday in Switzerland. While there, their impulsive younger daughter gets into a scrape that teaches the whole family a lesson in love and faith. Summary by Devorah Allen.

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 051

Seventeen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include philosophy--Bertrand Russell, Spinoza, and Epictetus; science and invention--the Wright brothers, Leibniz, arctic explorer Sir John Franklin, spider webs, and cylindrical silos; plays and cinema--Lillian Gish and Friedrich Schiller; satire--selections from Ambrose Bierce, Robert Benchley, and Seneca; biographies--Aaron Burr, and Sophia Packard of Spellman College; the murder of Archbishop Charles Seghers in Alaska in 1886; and a history of Torre Abbey in England. Summary by Sue Anderson Against the Epicurean and Academics was translated by T. W. Rolleston.

By: George Vivian Poore (1843-1904)

Book cover London (Ancient And Modern) From The Sanitary And Medical Point Of View

This little book is an expansion of two addresses delivered in January, 1889. One deals with sanitary issues in London. The other deals with medical issues, mainly through the lives and careers of physicians. Though ancients are included, the main emphasis is upon the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries. - Summary by Book Preface and David Wales

By: Mary Emily Donelson Wilcox (1829-1905)

Book cover Christmas Under Three Flags

This work details personal memories of Mary Emily Donelson Wilcox, adopted granddaughter of Rachel Donelson Jackson, wife of President Andrew Jackson, and assumed to be the first baby born in the White House. The book focuses on three Christmas memories--the first of a Christmas in the White House during the 1830's and Jackson's Presidency; the second, a Christmas in Prussia at the home of the Crown Prince, to which she was invited because her father was US minister to Berlin; the last story, a Christmas in Texas in the 1830s...

By: Richard Ferris

Book cover How It Flies or, Conquest of the Air

In these pages, by means of simple language and suitable pictures, the author has told the story of the Ships of the Air. He has explained the laws of their flight; sketched their development to the present day; shown how to build the flying machine and the balloon, and how to operate them; recounted what man has done, and what he hopes to do with their aid. In a word, all the essential facts that enter into the Conquest of the Air have been gathered into orderly form, and are here presented to the public...

By: Frank Allaben (1867-1927)

Book cover Concerning Genealogies

Written over a century ago, this comprehensive book offers insight into the methods used to research and compile a family history. As stated in the preface of the book, "Strong emphasis is laid upon the importance of employing the historical method..." which is sorely lacking in today's computerized compilations. - Summary by Roger Melin

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 052

Seventeen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include Nature and Science--fall scenery, rose oil, large type books for low vision, the pulmotor, and the method of scientific investigation; Philosophy and Thought--Joseph Priestly, Kierkegaard, Rousseau, and A.C. Bradley on poetry; History and Travel--John Johnston founder of Sault St. Marie, eating in Berlin, and Sir John Mandeville's travels; a Japanese folk tale; a defense of Lady Bryon by Harriet Beecher Stowe, and a Virginia slave narrative by Minnie Fulkes. "Preparation for a Christian Life" was translated by Lee M. Hollander.

By: Robert G. Ingersoll (1833-1899)

Book cover Works of Robert G. Ingersoll, Volume 10 - Legal

For those who like courtroom drama, here are Ingersoll’s Opening and Closing arguments on the most famous trials of his career--the Star Route Trials which stretched over 2 years, revealing high government corruption in the U.S. Post Office system's westward expansion. Ingersoll was lead counsel for the defense. Compiled from countless reports and endless conflicting details , it was said that his prodigious memory of the minutest details without referring to the record, knowledge of the law,...

By: Edward Anthony (1895-1971)

Book cover Pussycat Princess

This pussycat is out to have some adventurous fun in this enjoyable fairy tale for boys, girls and parents. Summary by Lynda Marie Neilson

By: Ellen Thorneycroft Fowler (1860-1929)

Book cover Subjection Of Isabel Carnaby

This is a sequel to "Concerning Isabel Carnaby". Isabel and Paul Seaton are now happily married. This book tells about their trials and tribulations, their little son, and, of course, their love for each other. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 053

Twenty short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include History--Jocelyn de Brakelond's 13th century chronicle of the Bury St. Edmund monastery, Lorenzo de Medici's Florence, the voyage of the Mayflower, and Mark Twain's essay Stirring Times in Austria; Philosophy--Kierkegaard and Leibniz; Speeches, Sermons, and Diary Entries from Abraham Lincoln, Robert Ingersoll, and Queen Victoria; Literature--a tribute to George Meredith and a critique of Mencken's The American Language; and Nature and the Natural World--George Mallory outlining the route to the summit of Mt...

By: Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)

Book cover Origin and Development of Psychoanalysis

A series of lectures given in the USA by Freud in German, later translated into English - Summary by Peter Tucker

By: Florence Morse Kingsley (1859-1937)

Book cover Neighbors

The final story featuring the inhabitants of the growing township of Innisfield: Mrs Philura Pettibone’s story reaches its long-awaited conclusion and Miss Malvina’s life is changed forever by the arrival of various ”fur’ners”. Published in 1917, with America’s entry into the war in Europe imminent, the story dwells on friendships, the melting- pot of nationalities that make up the USA, and the personal struggle between pacifism and patriotism in wartime. While the writing keeps its gently ironic style for most of the time, it also features more serious and sometimes rather melodramatic themes...

By: George William Askinson

Book cover Perfumes and their Preparation

Most of us take for granted the sense of smell. It gives pleasure, warning, anticipation and a sense of nostalgia. People have used perfumes since the days of Ancient Persia and Egypt in order to improve their personal smell. In this work, Askinson traces the history of perfumery and gives us an overview of the sources of perfumes and how they are manipulated to enhance our lives. - Summary by Lynne Thompson

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 054

Sixteen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include Science and Exploration--a tribute to Egyptologist Amelia Edwards, and discourses on gravitation and relativity by Georges-Louis Le Sage and Ralph Sampson; Sociology and Society--Julio Guerrero on the Mexican character, reflections on life from Kierkegaard's Diapsalmata, Immanuel Kant on religious education, the fate of romance in the King of Siam's harem, nickelodeons, and the tragic results...

By: U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Book cover Migration of Birds

Snow Geese which left James Bay, Canada, arrived at the Louisiana Gulf coast "60 hours later after a continuous flight of over 1,700 miles at an average speed of 28 miles per hour." This is just one of the many intriguing facts about bird migration contained in this 1998 circular from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Informative and up-to-date chapters discuss flight speed and rate of migration, migration routes, and techniques for studying migration. A final chapter, Future Directions, concludes...

By: Pansy (1841-1930)

Book cover Miss Dee Dunmore Bryant

The Bryant family - widowed Mrs. Bryant and her children Benjamin, Caroline , and little Daisy - is on the thin edge of poverty due to debt incurred when Mr. Bryant was alive. We follow the family, especially Ben and Daisy, as they help shoulder some of the burden. Prominent in the story are children's dolls, which are the means to some of the family's income. - Summary by TriciaG

By: William Ruschenberger (1807-1895)

Book cover Elements of Anatomy and Physiology

The Elements of Anatomy and Physiology is one in a Series of First Books of Natural History Prepared for the Use of Schools and Colleges. This succinct little textbook from 1852 presents an introduction to the workings of the human body. The information, albeit not current, is still interesting and of use as a general overview of the subject as well as interesting look into the period. Please note that some of the information may have changed considerably since this time. The author was a surgeon in the U.S. Navy and president of the Academy of Natural Sciences. - Summary by A. Gramour

By: John Salmond (1862-1924)

Book cover Jurisprudence

"[This book] is written primarily for the use of those students of the law who are desirous of laying a scientific foundation for their legal education ; yet I hope that it will not be found destitute of interest by those lawyers whose academic studies lie behind them, but who have not wholly ceased to concern themselves with the theoretical and scientific aspects of the law. Further, a great part of what I have written is sufficiently free from the technicalities and details of the concrete legal system to serve the purposes of laymen"

By: Carl Werner (1873-1945)

Book cover Bringing up the Boy

''Bringing up the Boy'' is, according to its subtitle, ''A Message to Fathers and Mothers from a Boy of Yesterday concerning the Men of To-morrow'' and proffers advice for parents on raising boys from infancy until adulthood, to become fine, upstanding men. The fact that boys are temperamentally, emotionally and physically different from girls is never lost sight of in the discussions in the various chapters. Discussions include: advice on allowing boys to settle their own differences, without interference,...

By: Ellen Douglas Deland (1860-1923)

Book cover Friendship of Anne: A Story

This is the story of Sydney Stuart who is sent to a girls' boarding school with all its difficulties and adventures. Sydney Stuart and her school roomate/rival Bertha Macy vie for the friendship of schoolmate Anne Talbot. Summary by Lynda Marie Neilson

By: Various

Book cover Short Nonfiction Collection, Vol. 055

Fifteen short nonfiction works in the public domain, independently chosen by the readers. Topics include Philosophy and Psychology: selections from Kierkegaard's "Preparation for a Christian Life" and Jung's "The Hymn of Creation," and an exploration of Hegel's psychology; Arts and the Avant-garde: critiques of Kreymborg by Lola Ridge and of Pablo Picasso by Marius de Zayas, the rationale behind "1001 Afternoons in Chicago" by Ben Hecht, and notes on the 15th century inventors of moveable type;...

By: Jenny H. Stickney

Book cover Bird World: A Bird Book for Children

Bird World is a children's guide to New England Birds. It explores the characteristics, habitat, and songs of native birds. - Summary by Jennifer Dallman


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