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By: Samuel Taylor Coleridge (1772-1834)

Book cover Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Select Poems

By: Samuel Wesley (1662-1735)

Book cover Epistle to a Friend Concerning Poetry (1700) and the Essay on Heroic Poetry (second edition, 1697)

By: Sara Teasdale (1884-1933)

Book cover Helen of Troy and Other Poems
Book cover India Wharf

Sara Teasdale was an American lyric poet.

Book cover Mastery

LibriVox volunteers bring you 21 recordings of Mastery by Sara Teasdale. This was the Weekly Poetry project for April 28th, 2013.

Book cover Leaves

Autumn, interchangeably known as fall in North America, is one of the four temperate seasons. Autumn marks the transition from summer into winter, in September (Northern Hemisphere) or March (Southern Hemisphere), when the arrival of night becomes noticeably earlier and the temperature cools considerably. One of its main features is the shedding of leaves from deciduous trees. In North America, autumn is usually considered to start with the September equinox (21 or 22) and end with the winter solstice (21 or 22 December). (Wikipedia)

Book cover Old Maid (Teasdale)

LibriVox volunteers bring you 10 recordings of The Old Maid by Sara Teasdale. This was the Weekly Poetry project for September 8, 2013.

Book cover Spring, 1918

LibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of Spring, 1918 by Sara Teasdale. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 11th, 2014.

By: Sarah Frances Price (1849-1903)

Book cover Songs from the Southland

By: Sarah Orne Jewett (1849-1909)

Book cover Widow's House

LibriVox volunteers bring you 12 recordings of The Widows' House by Sarah Orne Jewett. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for November 11, 2012.Sarah Orne Jewett was an American novelist and short story writer, best known for her local color works set along or near the southern seacoast of Maine.

Book cover Widow's House

LibriVox volunteers bring you 12 recordings of The Widows' House by Sarah Orne Jewett. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for November 11, 2012.Sarah Orne Jewett was an American novelist and short story writer, best known for her local color works set along or near the southern seacoast of Maine.

By: Sarah S. Mower

Book cover The Snow-Drop

By: Sarojini Naidu (1879-1949)

Book cover Golden Threshold

Sarojini Naidu was a remarkable woman. Known as the Nightingale of India, she started writing at the age of thirteen and throughout her life composed several volumes of poetry, writing many poems which are still famous to this day. As well as being a poet, Naidu was an activist and politician, campaigning for Indian independence and became the first Indian woman to attain the post of President of the Indian National Congress. This volume contains the beautiful 'Indian Love-Song', as well as many other moving verses...

By: Sebastian Brant (1458-1521)

Book cover The Ship of Fools, Volume 1

By: Sidney Lanier (1842-1881)

Book cover The Song of the Chattahoochee.

Sidney Clopton Lanier was an American musician, poet and author. He served in the Confederate army, worked on a blockade running ship for which he was imprisoned (resulting in his catching tuberculosis), taught, worked at a hotel where he gave musical performances, was a church organist, and worked as a lawyer. As a poet he used dialects. He became a flautist and sold poems to publications. He eventually became a university professor and is known for his adaptation of musical meter to poetry. Many schools, other structures and two lakes are named for him.

Book cover My Springs

LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 recordings of My Springs by Sidney Lanier. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for April 7th, 2013. This rather lovely poem is the poet's tribute to his wife's eyes.

By: Siegfried Sassoon (1886-1967)

Book cover Counter-Attack and Other Poems

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)

Book cover Songs of the Road

Although best known for the creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes, Arthur Conan Doyle did not only write works of mystery and of advenure - he was also a rather successful poet. This is a collection of poems written by the famous author.

Book cover Songs of Action

This is a collection of poems by Arthur Conan Doyle centering around the theme of war, action and adventure.

Book cover Guards Came Through and other Poems

This is a volume of poems by Arthur Conan Doyle, published in 1919. Many of them concern wartime experiences.

By: Sir John Suckling

The Constant Lover by Sir John Suckling The Constant Lover

Sir John Suckling (1609-42) was one of the Cavalier poets at the court of King Charles I of England. He took up arms in the conflicts of that era but was said to be more fit for the boudoir than the battlefield. He was a prolific lover, a sparkling wit and an excessive gamester and is credited with inventing the card game, Cribbage. Cavalier poetry was witty, decorous and sometimes naughty. The Constant Lover displays these elements as well as Suckling’s conversational ease and charm.

By: Sir Philip Sidney (1554-1586)

Astrophil and Stella by Sir Philip Sidney Astrophil and Stella

Astrophil and Stella is a sonnet sequence written by Philip Sidney, an Elizabethan poet and courtier. It details the frustrated love of Astrophil (whose name means “star-lover”) for his beloved Stella (whose name means “star”). It is likely that Sidney based his poems on his own unrequited passion for a married woman. The sequence inspired other sonnet writers of the period, such as Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, and Lady Mary Wroth.

Book cover To Sleep

LibriVox volunteers bring you 11 recordings of To Sleep by Sir Philip Sidney. This was the Weekly Poetry project for January 23, 2014. Sir Philip Sidney (30 November 1554 – 17 October 1586) was an English poet, courtier and soldier, who is remembered as one of the most prominent figures of the Elizabethan age.

By: Sir Walter Raleigh (1552-1618)

Book cover A selection of poems by Sir Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh (c. 1552 – 29 October 1618) was an English aristocrat, writer, poet, soldier, courtier, spy, and explorer. He is also well known for popularising tobacco in England.Raleigh's poetry is written in the relatively straightforward, unornamented mode known as the plain style. C. S. Lewis considered Raleigh one of the era's "silver poets", a group of writers who resisted the Italian Renaissance influence of dense classical reference and elaborate poetic devices.In poems such as "What is Our Life" and "The Lie", Raleigh expresses a contemptus mundi (contempt of the world) attitude more characteristic of the Middle Ages than of the dawning era of humanistic optimism...

By: Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)

The Lord of the Isles by Sir Walter Scott The Lord of the Isles

In stunning narrative poetry, the story begins during the time when Robert Bruce, Earl of Carrick has been hunted out of Scotland into exile by the English and their allies. Bruce returns over sea from the Island of Rachrin: but is forced to land close to hostile forces at Artonish Castle on the seacoast of Argylshire. Seeking refuge from tempestuous seas, Bruce begs shelter from Ronald, Lord of the Isles: inadvertently on the day of his marriage feast to the beautiful Edith of Lorn.Bruce's very...

Harold the Dauntless by Sir Walter Scott Harold the Dauntless

Harold the Dauntless is a rhymed, romantic, narrative-poem by Sir Walter Scott. Written in 1817, it weaves together elements of popular English legends and folklore using dramatic themes.The poem recounts the exploits and the personal spiritual journey of a doubtful knight errant - Harold the son of Danish Count Witikind: who seeks to recover his lands and wed a suitable spouse.Fire-breathing Harold is as much a stranger to love as he is addicted to dangerous adventure: yet his own confrontations with the spirit-world shake his faith in supposed omnipotence of the traditional Norse pantheon...

Translations & Imitations of German Ballads by Sir Walter Scott Translations & Imitations of German Ballads

The narrative poems in this collection are written by Sir Walter Scott - the well-known English poet and novelist. Each of these five poems are based loosely upon German ballads: rewritten in flowing English meter.The Chase - a.k.a. The Wild Huntsman - A profligate, noble-born keeper of the royal forest - avidly addicted to the pleasures of the hunt - cruelly uses and mistreats his fellow-men. One day God's messengers come to test him: executing sentence immediately in just proportion to the huntsman's responses...

The Bridal of Triermain by Sir Walter Scott The Bridal of Triermain

Scott's The Bridal of Triermain is a rhymed, romantic, narrative poem which weaves together elements of popular English legend using dramatic themes. This beautiful poem celebrates the exploits of a knight errant - Sir Roland De Vaux - as he seeks to rescue (and hopefully espouse) a beautiful maiden, Gyneth. Gyneth is the illegitimate daughter of King Arthur: doomed by Merlin 500 years previously to an enchanted sleep inside a magic castle. The enchantment can only be broken by a rescuer both brave and noble enough to overcome the temptations used successively to distract and overcome him, namely: fear, wealth, pleasure and pride.(Introduction by Godsend)

The Lady of the Lake by Sir Walter Scott The Lady of the Lake

The scene of the following Poem is laid chiefly in the vicinity of Loch Katrine, in the Western Highlands of Perthshire. The time of Action includes Six Days, and the transactions of each Day occupy a Canto.

By: Smyrnaeus Quintus (4th century)

Book cover The Fall of Troy

By: Sophia Margaretta Hensley (1866-1913)

Book cover A Woman's Love Letters
Book cover Poems

By: Sophocles (c. 497 BC - c. 406 BC)

Oedipus Rex by Sophocles Oedipus Rex

Oedipus the King (often known by the Latin title Oedipus Rex) is an Athenian tragedy by Sophocles that was first performed c. 429 BC. It was the second of Sophocles's three Theban plays to be produced, but it comes first in the internal chronology, followed by Oedipus at Colonus and then Antigone. Over the centuries, it has come to be regarded by many as the Greek tragedy par excellence.

Antigone by Sophocles Antigone

This is the final installment in Sophocles's Theban Plays, following Oedipus Rex and Oedipus at Colonus. Oedipus's daughter Antigone deliberately breaks the laws of Thebes when she buries her brother's body and is sentenced to death. She clashes with Creon, the King of Thebes, over what constitutes justice and morality: the laws of the state or the laws of the individual.

By: Stephen Crane (1871-1900)

War is Kind (collection) by Stephen Crane War is Kind (collection)

Published in 1899, just a year before his death, War Is Kind by Stephen Crane evokes again the dark imagery of war which made his fortune in The Red Badge Of Courage. Unlike that book, this collection leaves the battlefield itself behind to explore the damage war does to people’s hearts and minds. Reeking of dashed hopes, simultaneously sympathetic with the victims of war and cynical about the purposes of war, Crane implicitly criticizes the image of the romantic hero and asks if Love can survive...

By: Stephen Hawes (-1523)

Book cover A Ioyfull medytacyon to all Englonde of the coronacyon of our moost naturall souerayne lorde kynge Henry the eyght (A Joyful Meditation of the Coronation of King Henry the Eighth)
Book cover The Example of Vertu The Example of Virtue
Book cover The cõforte of louers The Comfort of Lovers
Book cover The Conuercyon of swerers (The Conversion of Swearers)

By: Stephen Langdon (1876-1937)

Book cover The Epic of Gilgamish A Fragment of the Gilgamish Legend in Old-Babylonian Cuneiform

By: Stephen Vincent Benét (1898-1943)

A Selection from Young Adventure, A Book of Poems by Stephen Vincent Benét A Selection from Young Adventure, A Book of Poems

Stephen Vincent Benét (July 22, 1898 – March 13, 1943) was an American author, poet, short story writer and novelist. He is best known for his book-length narrative poem of the American Civil War, John Brown’s Body (1928), for which he won a Pulitzer Prize in 1929, and for two short stories, “The Devil and Daniel Webster” and “By the Waters of Babylon”. It was a line of Benét’s poetry that gave the title to Dee Brown’s famous history of the destruction of Native American tribes by the United States: Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee.

By: Susan Coolidge (1835-1905)

Book cover Verses

Susan Coolidge was the pen name of Sarah Chauncey Woolsey, who is best known for her What Katy Did series. This is the first of three volumes of her verse.

By: Susanna Moodie (1803-1885)

Book cover Roughing It in the Bush

'Roughing It In the Bush' is Susanna Moodie's account of how she coped with the harshness of life in the woods of Upper Canada, as an Englishwoman homesteading abroad. Her narrative was constructed partly as a response to the glowing falsehoods European land-agents were circulating about life in the New World. Her chronicle is frank and humorous, and was a popular sensation at the time of its publication in 1852.

Book cover Enthusiasm and Other Poems

By: T. W. H. Crosland (1865-1924)

Book cover Little People: An Alphabet

By: The Gawain Poet

Pearl by The Gawain Poet Pearl

Written in the 14th century by the Gawain poet, 'Pearl' is an elegiac poem reflecting on the death of a young daughter, pictured as a pearl lost in a garden. It is considered a masterpiece of Middle English verse, incorporating both the older tradition of alliterative poetry as well as rhyme, centered around the development of an intricately structured image. Sophie Jewett's translation from the Northern dialect of the original renders much of the poem's liveliness and beauty accessible to modern readers, whilst encouraging them to pursue their reading further, to read the original itself.This recording is dedicated to the memory of Pearl Jean Shearman, 1914-2012.

By: Theodore H. (Theodore Harding) Rand (1835-1900)

Book cover Song-waves

By: Theodosia Pickering Garrison (1874-1944)

Book cover The Dreamers And Other Poems

By: Théophile Gautier (1811-1872)

Book cover Enamels and Cameos and other Poems

By: Thomas Babington Macaulay

The Lays of Ancient Rome by Thomas Babington Macaulay The Lays of Ancient Rome

The Lays of Ancient Rome comprise four narrative poems comprised by Lord Thomas Babington Macaulay: recalling popular episodes from Roman historical-legends that were strongly moral in tone: exemplifying Roman virtue against Latine perfidy.The four poems are:- Horatius - Horatius and two companions seek to hold back a large invading Etruscan force at the far end of a bridge over the Tiber River. The trio are willing to lay down their lives so as to prevent the Etruscans crossing and sacking the otherwise ill-defended Rome: it is a desperate gamble to buy enough time for the Romans to destroy the bridge in advance of the hostile army...

By: Thomas Bailey Aldrich (1836-1907)

Book cover The Sisters' Tragedy
Book cover Wyndham Towers

By: Thomas Burke (1886-1945)

Book cover Song Book of Quong Lee of Limehouse

By: Thomas Cooper (1805-1892)

Book cover The Baron's Yule Feast: A Christmas Rhyme

By: Thomas Cowherd (1817-1907)

Book cover The Emigrant Mechanic and Other Tales in Verse Together with Numerous Songs Upon Canadian Subjects

By: Thomas Crane (1843?-)

Book cover Abroad

By: Thomas Gray (1716-1771)

Book cover Select Poems of Thomas Gray

By: Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)

Moments of Vision by Thomas Hardy Moments of Vision

Hardy claimed poetry as his first love, and published collections until his death in 1928. Although not as well received by his contemporaries as his novels, Hardy’s poetry has been applauded considerably in recent years. Most of his poems deal with themes of disappointment in love and life, and mankind’s long struggle against indifference to human suffering.

Book cover In Time Of The Breaking Of Nations

LibriVox volunteers bring you 9 recordings of "In Time Of The Breaking Of Nations" by Thomas Hardy. This was the Weekly Poetry project for June 30, 2013.Written during the First World War, this is a poem about love, war and their timelessness by one of the best Victorian novelists.

Book cover Poems of the Past and the Present
Book cover Wessex Poems

A collection of poetry by Thomas Hardy, some of which were previously published or adapted into his prose works.

Book cover Late Lyrics and Earlier
Book cover Satires of Circumstance
Book cover Time's Laughingstocks

By: Thomas Haynes Bayly (1797-1839)

Book cover Oh! Where do the Fairies Hide Their Heads

Librivox volunteers bring you 12 readings of Oh! Where Do the Fairies Hide Their heads by Thomas Haynes Bayly. Oh! Where do the fairies hide their heads, When snow lies on the hills, When frost has spoiled their mossy beds, And crystallized their Rills? Beneath the moon they cannot trip In circles o’er the plain; And draughts of dew they cannot sip, Till green leaves come again.This was the weekly poetry project for February 15, 2015.

By: Thomas Hood (1799-1845)

Book cover Workhouse Clock

There were scarcely any events in the life of Thomas Hood. One condition there was of too potent determining importance—life-long ill health; and one circumstance of moment—a commercial failure, and consequent expatriation. Beyond this, little presents itself for record in the outward facts of this upright and beneficial career, bright with genius and coruscating with wit, dark with the lengthening and deepening shadow of death.

Book cover Death-bed

Thomas Hood was an English poet, author, and humourist, best known for poems such as The Bridge of Sighs and The Song of the Shirt. Hood wrote regularly for The London Magazine, the Athenaeum, and Punch. He later published a magazine largely consisting of his own works. Hood, never robust, lapsed into invalidism by the age of 41 and died at the age of 45. William Michael Rossetti in 1903 called him "the finest English poet" between the generations of Shelley and Tennyson.

By: Thomas James Wise (1859-1937)

Book cover The Return of the Dead and Other Ballads
Book cover Queen Berngerd, The Bard and the Dreams and other ballads
Book cover Alf the Freebooter Little Danneved and Swayne Trost and other Ballads
Book cover Grimmer and Kamper The End of Sivard Snarenswayne and other ballads
Book cover King Diderik and the fight between the Lion and Dragon and other ballads
Book cover The Nightingale, the Valkyrie and Raven and other ballads
Book cover Brown William The Power of the Harp and Other Ballads
Book cover The Brother Avenged and Other Ballads
Book cover Little Engel a ballad with a series of epigrams from the Persian
Book cover Axel Thordson and Fair Valborg a ballad
Book cover The Expedition to Birting's Land and other ballads
Book cover Marsk Stig's Daughters and other Songs and Ballads
Book cover Hafbur and Signe a ballad
Book cover Niels Ebbesen and Germand Gladenswayne two ballads
Book cover Marsk Stig a ballad
Book cover Proud Signild and Other Ballads
Book cover Ermeline a ballad

By: Thomas Moore (1779-1852)

Book cover Meeting of the Waters

LibriVox volunteers bring you 16 recordings of The Meeting of the Waters by Thomas Moore. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for November 25, 2102.

Book cover Farewell -- But Whenever --

Librivox volunteers bring you seven readings of Farewell! – But Whenever – by Thomas Moore. This is the fortnightly poetry project for October 12, 2014.

By: Thomas Morrison (1705-1778)

Book cover A Pindarick Ode on Painting Addressed to Joshua Reynolds, Esq.

By: Thomas Nash (1567-1601)

Book cover The Choise of Valentines Or the Merie Ballad of Nash His Dildo

By: Thomas Osborne Davis (1814-1845)

Book cover Thomas Davis, Selections from his Prose and Poetry

By: Thomas Phillipps (1792-1872)

Book cover The Departing Soul's Address to the Body A Fragment of a Semi-Saxon Poem, Discovered Among the Archives of Worcester Cathedral

By: Thomas Runciman (1841-1909)

Book cover Songs, Sonnets & Miscellaneous Poems

By: Thomas S. (Thomas Samuel) Jones (1882-1932)

Book cover The Rose-Jar

By: Thomas S. Chard

Book cover Across the Sea and Other Poems.

By: Thomas S. Eliot (1888-1965)

The Waste Land by Thomas S. Eliot The Waste Land

Whether you enjoy poetry or not, TS Eliot's The Wasteland is a work of literature that makes a rich, compelling, mystical and thought-provoking reading experience. It's one of those timeless works that seems to renew itself on each subsequent reading and you will find something new and unique every time. Some of the lines have become familiar to many of us: “April is the cruellest month....” “I will show you fear in a handful of dust” and many more. Written after the moral and social crisis that gripped much of the world after the end of WWI, this poem was considered experimental and path-breaking for that era...

Book cover Poems
Book cover Prufrock and Other Observations

By: Thomas Tod Stoddart (1810-1880)

Book cover The Death-Wake or Lunacy; a Necromaunt in Three Chimeras

By: Thomas Washington Talley

Book cover Negro Folk Rhymes Wise and Otherwise: With a Study

By: Thomas Woolner (1825-1892)

Book cover My Beautiful Lady. Nelly Dale

By: Titus Lucretius Carus (94? BC - 49? BC)

On the Nature of Things by Titus Lucretius Carus On the Nature of Things

Written in the first century b.C., On the Nature of Things (in Latin, "De Rerum Natura") is a poem in six books that aims at explaining the Epicurean philosophy to the Roman audience. Among digressions about the importance of philosophy in men's life and praises of Epicurus, Lucretius created a solid treatise on the atomic theory, the falseness of religion and many kinds of natural phenomena. With no harm to his philosophical scope, the author composed a didactic poem of epic flavor, of which the imagery and style are highly praised.


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