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By: Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865)

Book cover Emancipation Proclamation

After having written and released an initial draft of this proclamation in September of 1862, minor changes were made and Lincoln signed it on January 1st, 1863. It declared free the slaves in 10 states not then under Union control, with exemptions specified for areas already under Union control in two states. Lincoln spent the next 100 days preparing the army and the nation for emancipation, while Democrats rallied their voters in the 1862 off-year elections by warning of the threat freed slaves posed to northern whites...

By: Hans Gross (1847-1915)

Book cover Criminal Investigation: a Practical Handbook for Magistrates, Police Officers and Lawyers, Volume 1

Reputedly inspired by the Sherlock Holmes stories, Austrian criminal jurist and examining magistrate Hans Gross wrote the first handbook on criminal investigation. This treatise covers everything from the qualities of a good investigating officer and how to utilize various experts, to tactics employed by criminals, how to analyze footprints and blood stains, and ways that criminals perpetrate crimes. Some of the remarks relate directly to India, such as disguising one's caste.Volume 1 (of 3) consists of Part 1 of the 4 parts in the work.

By: Francis Rolt-Wheeler (1876-1960)

Book cover Science - History of the Universe Vol. 1: Astronomy

Multi-volume work on science edited by Francis Rolt-Wheeler. The first volume is on Astronomy written by Waldemar Kaempffert. This book briefly discusses the evolution of astronomical beliefs and the development of instruments and progress of methods in the science. It explains, further, the different astronomical laws, theories, phenomena and objects, as well as the history of these discoveries.

By: William Ruschenberger (1807-1895)

Book cover Elements of Mammalogy

The Elements of Mammalogy is one of seven in a Series of First Books of Natural History Prepared for the Use of Schools and Colleges. This succinct little textbook from 1845 presents an introduction to mammalogy. The information, albeit not current, is still interesting and of use as a general overview of mammal biology. The classification of mammals has changed considerably since this time. The author was a surgeon in the U.S. Navy and president of the Academy of Natural Sciences.

By: Constantine Panunzio (1884-1964)

Book cover Deportation Cases of 1919-1920

"The study here presented embodies the findings of an investigation into the recent [1919-1920] deportations of persons deemed to be unlawfully in the country. . . Its purpose is to call public attention to practices that are inconsistent with the American tradition of justice and fair-play."

By: A. T. Anderson (?-?)

Book cover How to Do Chemical Tricks

While a bit outdated in many of the more complex descriptions of several of the phenomena described, this book is nonetheless still fun and relevant for a person interested in basic chemistry or physics tricks, and the devices built in the book can be easily replicated with more modern materials. The book is split up into many little experiments, tricks, with an explanation on how it works, what's happening, and how to reproduce the effects at home.

By: Sir William Henry Bragg (1862-1942)

Book cover World of Sound

The World of Sound consists of six lectures delivered before a juvenile audience at the Royal Institution, Christmas 1919. The Royal Institution Christmas Lectures are a series of lectures on a single topic, which have been held at the Royal Institution in London each year since 1825, except several years during the Second World War. The lectures present scientific subjects to a general audience, including young people, in an informative and entertaining manner. Michael Faraday initiated the first Christmas Lecture series in 1825, at a time when organised education for young people was scarce...

By: Various

Book cover Selection of 19th Century Scientific Verse

In the 18th and early 19th centuries, it was common for discoveries in branches of science such as botany, astronomy and medicine to be described in book-length treatises in verse. By the end of the 19th century this mode of popularising science was falling from favour as the studies of science and the humanities diverged and study became more specialised.This small selection of somewhat lighter-hearted verse written by distinguished scientists and mathematicians of the day includes poems by James Clerk Maxwell, William J. Macquorn Rankine and James Joseph Sylvester.

By: William Ruschenberger (1807-1895)

Book cover Elements of Ornithology

The Elements of Ornithology is one of seven in a Series of First Books of Natural History Prepared for the Use of Schools and Colleges. This succinct little textbook from 1845 presents an introduction to ornithology. The information, albeit not current, is still interesting and of use as a general overview of bird biology and classification. The author was a surgeon in the U.S. Navy and president of the Academy of Natural Sciences.

By: Vernon Kellogg (1867-1937)

Book cover Insect Stories

These 13 essays explore the fascinating world of insects all around us. Vernon Kellogg, an eminent entomologist and natural story teller, and his little friend Mary, start by collecting Tarantula Holes and proceed to observe spiders, ant lions, ants, wasps and many other tiny creatures in their daily life. Each creature has a wonderful story and it is told most entertainingly.

By: D. B. Casteel (1877-1958)

Book cover Behavior of the Honey Bee in Pollen Collecting

The value of the honey bee in cross pollinating the flowers of fruit trees makes it desirable that exact information be available concerning the actions of the bee when gathering and manipulating the pollen. The results recorded in this manuscript are also of value as studies in the behavior of the bee and will prove interesting and valuable to the bee keeper. The work here recorded was done by Dr. Casteel during the summers of 1911 and 1912.

By: Grace Coleridge Frankland (1858-1946)

Book cover Bacteria in Daily Life

The author provides a fascinating look at the emerging science of bacteriology at the start of the twentieth century including early progress in understanding and preventing diseases such as tuberculosis and diphtheria. The book also includes chapters on the spread of disease through close contact with infected persons as well as from contaminated drinking water and milk. Water purification methods as well as the stability of various disease-causing organisms to extremes of heat and cold is discussed...

By: William Walker Atkinson (1862-1932)

Book cover Memory: How to Develop, Train and Use It

An in-depth series of chapters devoted to the use of our memory system; as the title suggests, how to develop our memory system, how to train it to improve it, and how to make the best use of it in our everyday lives, and to improve our positions in life. This is not intended to be a series of chapters to impress friends and colleagues, nor to play 'tricks' on others, rather it is for the betterment of individuals in whatever walk of life in which they may be involved by training and using their memory toward that end.

By: Dr. Albert Philip Sy (1872-?)

Book cover Food Values

A short pamphlet from WWI, a sequel of sorts to "Food Preparedness." It first describes basic nutrition and things to consider when choosing what foods to eat, then lists various foods and their amount of calories, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, water, and "ash". This was written before much was known about fat soluble vitamins or saturated vs. unsaturated fats.

By: Various

Book cover National Geographic Magazine Vol. 01 No. 4

National Geographic Magazine Volume 1 Number 4 published in 1889. Topics of articles are: Irrigation in California Round about Asheville A Trip to Panama and Darien Across Nicaragua with Transit and Machéte

By: Emma Goldman (1869-1940)

Book cover Deportation: Its Meaning and Menace. Last Message to the People of America

A pamphlet written by Alexander Berkman and Emma Goldman shortly before their deportation from the US in 1919.

By: Mason Long (1842-1903)

Book cover Save the Girls

Save the Girls is an 1880 American anti-white-slavery book by reformed gambler Mason Long. In it, the author crusades against the social evil of prostitution by presenting a series of pathetic portraits of young women from various social classes who are brought low by such temptations of city life as the theater, the racecourse, and street flirtations. Included are vignettes of vice like "The Evils of Dancing - Sad Results of a Public Ball," in which innocent Marie, out for a good time, falls prey to the type of 'sporting men' who prowl such events in search of a partner for more than just The Glide or the Boston Dip.

By: Arabella B. Buckley (1840-1929)

Book cover Through Magic Glasses and Other Lectures

"The present volume is chiefly intended for those of my young friends who have read, and been interested in, The Fairyland of Science. It travels over a wide field, pointing out a few of the marvellous facts which can be studied and enjoyed by the help of optical instruments. It will be seen at a glance that any one of the subjects dealt with might be made the study of a lifetime, and that the little information given in each lecture is only enough to make the reader long for more.In these days,...

By: Mary Antin (1881-1949)

Book cover They Who Knock at Our Gates

In 1914, over one million immigrants arrived in the United States, following in the footsteps of approximately ten million others who had arrived in the preceding decade. Faced with so many newcomers, many of them from backgrounds new to the American mix, voices in government and in the press had begun arguing in favor of more severely restrictionist immigration policies. In They Who Knock at Our Gates, Mary Antin broke down the discussion into three basic questions. First, the ethical question --...

By: Henry Fielding (1707-1754)

Book cover Enquiry Into The Causes Of The Late Increase Of Robbers

Early eighteenth century England saw the criminal element bargaining with magistrates and lawyers to be released or receive lenient sentences. Neither party could be trusted and the situation grew worse. Enter famed author Henry Fielding, who had a strong social conscience and served as a magistrate. In addition to this treatise, he began a register of convicted criminals, and recruited six full-time, paid constables - known colloquially as "The Bow Street Runners" and hailed as the forerunners of the modern police force.

By: Sir Thomas Edward Thorpe (1845-1925)

Book cover History of Chemistry, Volume II. From 1850-1910

A history of the advances in chemistry, in the fields of inorganic, organic and physical chemistry from the mid-nineteenth century through the early 1900s. Included are brief biographical sketches of some early pioneers in the field such as Mendeleev, Liebeg, Williamson, Dewar and others. Chapters covering the discovery of new elements, the developing understanding of structure, properties and reactivity, the beginnings of practical organic synthesis and the early work on stereoisomerism show how the way was paved for the discoveries that followed in the 20th century...

By: Eliza Burt Gamble (1841-1920)

Book cover Sexes in Science and History

In this revised second edition of her first book "The evolution of woman" (1894), subtitled "An inquiry into the dogma of woman's inferiority to man", Eliza Burt Gamble uses Darwin's theory of evolution and other scientific information to compare the development of the male and female organisms and describe their differences. Introducing the role of the woman in prehistoric society, we see how that changed through the course of history, from evidence both in less advanced tribes and in civilized historic societies, to the marked progress in the social and economic conditions of women in the time this edition was published (1916).

By: Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939)

Book cover Soul of London

'Most of us love places very much as we may love what, for us, are the distinguished men of our social lives. [...] We are, all of us who are Londoners, paying visits of greater or less duration to a Personality that, whether we love it or very cordially hate it, fascinates us all. And, paying my visit, I have desired to give some such record. I have tried to make it anything rather than encyclopaedic, topographical, or archaeological. To use a phrase of literary slang I have tried to "get the atmosphere" of modern London -- of the town in which I have passed so many days; of the immense place that has been the background for so many momentous happenings to so many of my fellows.'

By: President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Is

Book cover Report of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

At 4:00 a.m. on March 28, 1979, a serious accident occurred at the Three Mile Island 2 nuclear power plant near Middletown, Pennsylvania. The accident was initiated by mechanical malfunctions in the plant and made much worse by a combination of human errors in responding to it. During the next 4 days, the extent and gravity of the accident was unclear to the managers of the plant, to federal and state officials, and to the general public. What is quite clear is that its impact, nationally and internationally, has raised serious concerns about the safety of nuclear power. This Commission was established in response to those concerns.

By: Thomas Thomson (1773-1852)

Book cover History of Chemistry

Origin and progress of chemistry, from its beginnings in alchemy into the early 19th century including history and characters of important contributors to the science.

By: Charles C. Burleigh (1810-1878)

Book cover Thoughts on the Death Penalty

This 1845 publication, written by a prominent reformer of the day, argues against capital punishment from several perspectives, including historical, philosophical and biblical arguments. It is broken into 3 chapters: Expediency, Justice, and Sacred Scriptures . Burleigh frequently references and argues against George B. Cheever, a prominent death penalty advocate of the time."If it shall thus be the means of helping on in a humble way the progress of that humane reform whose principles it advocates;...

By: Arthur William Clayden (1855-1944)

Book cover Cloud Studies

Classification of clouds, and meteorological condition of how they are formed. Written by Arthur W. Clayden, M.A., who was the former principal of University College, Exeter, UK -

By: Olive Schreiner (1855-1920)

Book cover Woman and War

Olive Schreiner was a South African writer born in 1855 to missionary parents in the Eastern Cape. She is credited with being the first Internationally famous South African Novelist. She was an extraordinary person and was one of the earliest campaigners for women's rights, including the right to equal pay for equal work, saying: "The fact that for equal work equally well performed by a man and by a woman it is ordained that the woman on the ground of her sex alone shall receive a less recompense is the nearest approach to a willful and unqualified "wrong" in the whole relation of woman to society today"...

By: Arthur Griffiths (1838-1908)

Book cover Chronicles of Newgate Vol 1

Good against evil; right versus wrong; the judicial system against the criminal world. The struggle is as old as mankind. Sometimes the lines are blurred as the 'good' punish the 'bad' - the warriors against crime have resorted not only to killing wrong-doers, but additionally subjecting them to "starvation or the withholding of fluid, by drowning, stoning, impaling or by exposing the wretched victims to the stings of insects or snakes." Newgate Prison was one of the most famous - or infamous - prisons in England from the middle ages until the nineteenth century. Griffiths, a prison administrator, takes us inside where we discover "man's inhumanity to man".

By: Louis Compton Miall (1842-1921)

Book cover History of Biology

A history of biology from ancient times to Darwin and Pasteur by Louis Compton Miall, Professor of Biology, Fellow of the Royal Society, Fullerian Professor of Physiology and Comparative Anatomy at the University of Leeds. This book covers all the major advances in botany and zoology through the mid-1800's and concludes with the impact that Darwin's "Origin of Species" and Pasteur's research into microorganisms will have on future generations of biologists. “Science knows no country, because knowledge belongs to humanity, and is the torch which illuminates the world.” – Louis Pasteur

By: Francis Rolt-Wheeler (1876-1960)

Book cover Science - History of the Universe Vol. 2: Geology

Multi-volume work on science edited by Francis Rolt-Wheeler. The second volume is on Geology written by Harold E. Slade and W. E. Ferguson. This book covers the early efforts in and beginnings of geological concepts, development of the science through the 19th century and its different branches or field of study. It also discusses various geological processes. - Summary by Sienna

By: Hans Gross (1847-1915)

Book cover Criminal Investigation: a Practical Handbook for Magistrates, Police Officers and Lawyers, Volume 2

Reputedly inspired by the Sherlock Holmes stories, Austrian criminal jurist and examining magistrate Hans Gross wrote the first handbook on criminal investigation. This treatise covers everything from the qualities of a good investigating officer and how to utilize various experts, to tactics employed by criminals, how to analyze footprints and blood stains, and ways that criminals perpetrate crimes. Some of the remarks relate directly to India, such as disguising one's caste.Volume 2 consists of Parts 2 and 3 of the 4 parts in the work. - Summary by TriciaG

By: Nellie Bly (1864-1922)

Book cover Six Months In Mexico

This is an account of Nellie Bly's travels through Mexico in 1885. The book was originally a series of individual articles that she submitted to the Pittsburgh Dispatch newspaper for publication. In them she described the conditions of the people and the political system she found in Mexico. Her narratives focused mostly on the impoverished and disadvantaged in a country whose government was extremely corrupt. Bly was perhaps what we now term a feminist, striving for the empowerment and independence of women...

By: Mary Shauffler Labaree (1868-1954)

Book cover Child in the Midst: A Comparative Study of Child Welfare in Christian and Non-Christian Lands

Chapters follow the progression of a child from birth through working years.Thus, Chapter 1 traces the child from newborn to toddler stage in the home. It includes assumed rights of children and mothers, superstitions, diseases and treatments, and what missions are contributing. Continuing on, Chapter 2 compares homes in various countries, explains the need for teaching the mothers, and delves into roles of fathers and missions. Other chapters explore the importance of play, the clash between play and work, views on education, and the role of worship.

By: Edmond Halley (1656-1742)

Book cover Miscellanea Curiosa, Vol 1

"The Royal Society is a Fellowship of many of the world's most eminent scientists and is the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence." . As scientists have explored the world around them, observed and tried to explain natural phenomena, they have been invited to present papers to the Royal Society. Edmond Halley was an eminent member of the society and gathered together some of the most interesting papers of his day. Today, we may see errors in the logic or calculations, based on current knowledge, but these papers are unedited and as presented at the time and show how scientific knowledge was expanding in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries...

By: Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments

Book cover Final Report of the Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments

Researchers in the United States have performed thousands of human radiation experiments to determine the effects of atomic radiation and radioactive contamination on the human body. Most of these tests were performed, funded, or supervised by the United States military, Atomic Energy Commission, or various other U.S. federal government agencies. The experiments included a wide array of studies, involving things like feeding radioactive food to mentally disabled children, deliberately releasing radioactive chemicals over U...

By: William Ruschenberger (1807-1895)

Book cover Elements of Geology

Elements of Geology is one in a Series of First Books of Natural History Prepared for the Use of Schools and Colleges. This succinct little textbook from 1846 presents an introduction to geology. The information, albeit not current, is still interesting and of use as a general overview of the subject as well as interesting look into the period. Please note that some of the information has changed considerably since this time. The author was a surgeon in the U.S. Navy and president of the Academy of Natural Sciences. - Summary by Amy Gramour

By: Helena Swanwick (1864-1939)

Book cover Future of the Women's Movement

"There may seem to be a disappointing lack of prophesy in a book avowedly dealing with the future; but since I believe the women’s movement to be a seeking for knowledge and good, to show what is reasonable and good in the movement is to show what will persist and triumph. Through all our faults and mistakes, we women are aiming at better understanding and co-operation with men, and a better adaptation to one another of conditions and persons. We are having to hammer out for ourselves the right principles of government...

By: Gustave Le Bon (1841-1931)

Book cover Psychology of Peoples: Its Influence on Their Evolution

"It is barely a century and a half ago that certain philosophers, who, it should be remarked, were very ignorant of the primitive history of man, of the variations of his mental constitution and of the laws of heredity, propounded the idea of the equality of individuals and races... It is in the name of this idea that socialism, which seems destined to enslave before long the majority of Western peoples, pretends to ensure their welfare... The object of this work is to describe the psychological characteristics which constitute the soul of races, and to show how the history of a people and its civilisation are determined by these characteristics...

By: Hans Gross (1847-1915)

Book cover Criminal Investigation: a Practical Handbook for Magistrates, Police Officers and Lawyers, Volume 3

Reputedly inspired by the Sherlock Holmes stories, Austrian criminal jurist and examining magistrate Hans Gross wrote the first handbook on criminal investigation. This treatise covers everything from the qualities of a good investigating officer and how to utilize various experts, to tactics employed by criminals, how to analyze footprints and blood stains, and ways that criminals perpetrate crimes. Some of the remarks relate directly to India, such as disguising one's caste.Volume 3 consists of Part 4 of the 4 parts in the work. - Summary by TriciaG

By: Lewis Terman (1877-1956)

Book cover Measurement of Intelligence

An explanation of and a completed guide for the use of the Stanford revision and the Simon Binford intelligence test - Summary by the soloist

By: Fleming Mant Sandwith (1853-1918)

Book cover Sleeping Sickness

In the twenty-first century sleeping sickness is still a life-threatening disease of adults and children and a hazard to tourists in East African game parks.The protozoan parasite is transmitted by the tsetse fly, a buzzing insect with reddish eyes and a large biting proboscis. In 1912, when this short monograph was written, physicians of the British Empire understood that trans-continental expeditions manned by infected African porters, had set off an epidemic of sleeping sickness that had claimed half a million lives...

By: Francis Rolt-Wheeler (1876-1960)

Book cover Science - History of the Universe Vol. 3: Physics & Electricity

Multi-volume work on science edited by Francis Rolt-Wheeler. The third volume is on physics written by George Matthew and on electricity written by Professor William J. Moore. The section on physics covers matter - analysis and properties, heat, light - its sources and its nature, and sound. On the subject of electricity, it discusses the nature of electricity, electrostatics, fundamental discoveries in electric science and how electro-chemistry was developed and electromagnetic machines. It also details technologies advanced by discovery of electricity and electromagnetism such as electric lighting, the telephone, electric railway, telegraph and wireless telegraphy...

By: Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772)

Book cover Soul or Rational Psychology

Swedenborg, Emanuel, 1688-1772, was born in Stockholm, Sweden and died in London, England. He was a voluminous writer of scientific treatises as well as prophetic works such as Archana Caelestia and The Divine Providence. He said he had encountered supranational agencies and communicated with angels. This is a recording of the 1849 translation of his 1743 book The Soul or Rational Psychology Latin. He took his cue from Aristotle's De Anima. A few quotes It has been shown above that the harmonies...

By: Robert J. Braidwood (1907-2003)

Book cover Prehistoric Men

This little book, first published in 1948, is part of the Chicago Natural History Popular History series that explains difficult subjects in ways and terms we all can understand. It was published at a time in Anthropology when exciting things like carbon dating were first being used and refined. "Prehistory means the time before written history began. Actually, more than 99 per cent of man’s story is prehistory. Man is at least half a million years old, but he did not begin to write history until about 5,000 years ago...

By: Henry Mayhew (1812-1887)

Book cover London Labour and the London Poor Volume I

Subtitled, "A Cyclopaedia of the condition and earnings of those that will work, those that cannot work, and those that will not work." "The history of a people from the lips of the people themselves .. their labour, earnings, trials and sufferings, in their own unvarnished language, and to pourtray the condition of their homes and their families by personal observation of the places ..." "My earnest hope is that the book may serve to give the rich a more intimate knowledge of the sufferings, and the frequent heroism under those sufferings, of the poor ...

By: Francis Rolt-Wheeler (1876-1960)

Book cover Science - History of the Universe Vol. 5: Biology

Multi-volume work on science edited by Francis Rolt-Wheeler. The fifth volume is on Biology written by Caroline E. Stackpole. It discusses biology being the science of life and life’s nature and origins. It furthers explains functions and processes necessary for this life. It also covers evolution and factors that affect evolution. - Summary by Sienna

By: Bernard Le Bovier de Fontenelle (1657-1757)

Book cover Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds

This book is a popular science book written in the late 1600s. It is written as a series of conversations between a gallant philosopher and a countess, while walking in her garden and gazing at the stars. The philosopher explains the heliocentric model of the solar system and also muses on the possibility of extraterrestrial life. While it explains the heliocentric model, unlike other astronomy works of the time, it did not attract the attention of the Church.

By: Margaret Herschel (1810-1884)

Book cover Memoir and Correspondence of Caroline Herschel

For many people, the name Caroline Herschel will be unfamiliar, but she was one of the most significant women on the English scientific scene during the late 18th and early 19th century. Sister of the well known William Herschel , she first worked as his assistant in his astronomical works, and then went on to become a noted astronomer in her own right. She discovered eight new comets in her lifetime, and was the first woman to be paid for her contribution to science, and was awarded a Gold Medal...

By: Gertrude Chandler Warner (1890-1979)

Book cover Star Stories for Little Folks

Gertrude Chandler Warner, known mainly for her "Boxcar Children" series of mystery books, published this small book of Astronomy, Constellations, and the stories behind them in 1918. It follows the story of a little girl named Helen, and her friend Dr. Lorry as she learns about stars through stories, games, and more.

By: Harold Jacoby (1865-1932)

Book cover Practical Talks by an Astronomer

The present volume has not been designed as a systematic treatise on astronomy. There are many excellent books of that kind, suitable for serious students as well as the general reader; but they are necessarily somewhat dry and unattractive, because they must aim at completeness. Completeness means detail, and detail means dryness. But the science of astronomy contains subjects that admit of detached treatment; and as many of these are precisely the ones of greatest general interest, it has seemed well to select several, and describe them in language free from technicalities...

By: W. Mattieu Williams (1820-1892)

Book cover The Chemistry of Cookery

This book, written in the late 1800s, is a book of chemistry that explains the whys and hows of cooking to trained chefs and laymen alike. The book deals with some compounds of common foodstuffs, like albumen or gluten, and illustrates what happens from a chemist's point of view during certain types of food preparation like roasting, frying, or stewing. A part of the chapters also details adulterations of food - thankfully since outlawed - and how to detect them in the finished product.

By: George Wharton James (1858-1923)

Book cover What the White Race May Learn from the Indian

People learn from other people, and races have forever learned from other races. Herein we are treated to an in-depth understanding of categorized social characteristics of the Native American peoples, primarily those of the western U.S. as they existed at the time of book publication . 'In dealing with [the Native Americans] as a race, a people, therefore, I do as I would with my own race, I take what to me seem to be racial characteristics, or in other words, the things that are manifested in the lives of the best men and women, and which seem to represent their habitual aims, ambitions, and desires.' - Summary by Roger Melin & book foreword

By: Andress Small Floyd (1873-1933)

Book cover My Monks of Vagabondia

Before welfare or rehab, what happened to those unfortunates who lost their way, fell through the cracks, were cast off by society? Men such as Andress Floyd and his wife Lillian stepped up. In 1908, the philanthropists converted a mansion in New Jersey into a refuge for homeless men and during the more than 30 years of its operation, more than 100,000 men stayed there until they were able to get back on their feet. In this volume, Floyd has collected 13 diverse true tales of what brought some of the residents to seek succor and enlightenment at the Self-Mastery Colony. - Summary by Lynne Thompson

By: Various

Book cover Bomb: The 1945 Test of the First Atomic Bomb

These two publications put out by the U.S. government are about the Trinity site in New Mexico where in 1945 the first atomic bomb was tested. Each publication complements the other, though there is some duplication. These are descriptions of the test itself and of the planning and organization leading up to the test. They also tell what was done with the site after the test and how it became a national historic landmark. - Summary by david wales

By: Auguste Comte (1798-1857)

Book cover General View of Positivism

Auguste Comte was from France and published this book in French in 1844. He made a very great impact on the sciences and claims to have “discovered the principal laws of Sociology." Comte says Reason has become habituated to revolt but that doesn’t mean it will always retain its revolutionary character. He discusses Science, the trade-unions, Proletariat workers, Communists, Capitalists, Republicans, the role of woman in society, the elevation of Social Feeling over Self-love, and the Catholic Church in this book...

By: Dr. Benjamin Rush (1746-1813)

Book cover Inquiry into the Effects of Ardent Spirits upon the Human Body and Mind, with an Account of the Means of Preventing, and of the Remedies for Curing Them

Written when the United States extended only to the Mississippi River, by one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, this short work explores the physical, social, and mental effects of distilled liquors; the classes of people prone to intoxication by them; suggested drinks to use instead of them; and remedies for intoxication and for their habitual use. He takes a medical view of alcoholism, exploring the physical causes rather than blaming moral failure as the cause. Alcoholic drinks that are not distilled are viewed as wholesome drinks, and opium is suggested for pain as being without bad effects or addictive qualities.

By: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

Book cover Theory of Colours

Newton's observations on the optical spectrum were widely accepted but Goethe noticed the difference between the scientific explanation and the phenomena as experienced by the human eye. He did not try to explain this, but rather collected and presented data, conducting experiments on the interplay of light and dark. His work was rejected as 'unscientific' by physicists but his color wheel is still used by artists today. - Summary by Lynne Thompson

By: Francis Rolt-Wheeler (1876-1960)

Book cover Science - History of the Universe Vol. 4: Chemistry

Multi-volume work on science edited by Francis Rolt-Wheeler. The fourth volume is on Chemistry written by William Allan Hamor. It discusses the development of chemical knowledge, from the ancients to modern times. It expanded further on the early works of alchemists and into the phlogistic period. The last chapters cover atomic theories and the development of organic and inorganic chemistry. - Summary by Sienna

By: Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888)

Book cover Light Science for Leisure Hours

In preparing these Essays, my chief object has been to present scientific truths in a light and readable form—clearly and simply, but with an exact adherence to the facts as I see them. I have followed—here and always—the rule of trying to explain my meaning precisely as I should wish others to explain, to myself, matters with which I was unfamiliar. Hence I have avoided that excessive simplicity which some seem to consider absolutely essential in scientific essays intended for general perusal, but which is often even more perplexing than a too technical style...


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