Books Should Be Free
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Science

Results per page: 30 | 60 | 100
  • <
  • Page 9 of 32 
  • >
Book type:
Sort by:
View by:

By: Carey Rockwell

Book cover Treachery in Outer Space
Book cover The Revolt on Venus

By: Charles W. Diffin (1884-1966)

Two Thousand Miles Below by Charles W. Diffin Two Thousand Miles Below

A science fiction novel that was originally produced in four parts in the publication: Astounding Stories in June, September, November 1932, January 1933. The main character is Dean Rawson, who plans on discovering a way of mining power from a dead volcano, but ends up discovering more than he bargained for.

By: Clara Barton (1821-1912)

Book cover A Story of the Red Cross Glimpses of Field Work

By: Edwin E. Slosson (1865-1929)

Easy Lessons in Einstein by Edwin E. Slosson Easy Lessons in Einstein

Published in 1920, Slosson’s Easy Lessons in Einstein is one of the first popularizations of Einstein’s theory of relativity. This book is meant to convey to the general reader the ideas of relativity in non-mathematical terms, by the use of thought experiements and pop-cultural references of the day. This edition also includes a short article by Einstein on Time, Space and Gravitation.

Book cover Creative Chemistry

Slosson reviews the transformation of alchemistry from an obscure and imprecise practice to the science of chemistry. Along the way, he explains how the modern industrial world now relies on fertilizers, explosives, textile materials, polymers and metals.By exploring the properties of a once undervalued element, the high strength of vanadium steel made the Ford car possible. Another element, cerium, appears in butane lighters and was once seen as a threat to the match industry in France.In his chapter on oils, Slosson reviews the development of hydrogenated oils, especially during WWII, in the search for a way to reuse otherwise discarded components of corn and cottonseed...

By: George Müller (1805-1898)

Book cover The Life of Trust: Being a Narrative of the Lord's Dealings With George Müller
Book cover A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Müller Written by Himself, Fourth Part

By: Joseph Lister (1827-1912)

On the Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery by Joseph Lister On the Antiseptic Principle of the Practice of Surgery

Joseph Lister was born near London in 1827. He studied medicine at the University of London and pursued a career as a surgeon in Scotland. He became professor of Surgery in Glasgow and later (1877) at Kings College Hospital, in London. Lister’s contribution to the advancement of surgery cannot be overestimated. Before his work on antisepsis, wounds were often left open to heal, leading to long recoveries, unsightly scarring, and not infrequently amputation or death due to infection. Lister’s work enabled more wounds to be closed primarily with sutures, drastically reducing healing time, scarring, amputations, and deaths due to infection...

By: Frederick G. Aflalo (1870-1918)

Birds in the Calendar by Frederick G. Aflalo Birds in the Calendar

Delightful sketches of British wild birds – a bird for every month of the year from the pheasant in January to the robin in December. This collection of articles, reprinted in book form from the periodical The Outlook, is full of fascinating information about bird behaviour and habitat, as well as many interesting anecdotes. Out of date in some respects, particularly in its reference to the (now illegal) collecting of birds’ eggs, this book brings home forcefully how the populations of some British wild birds have declined since it was written.

By: Benedictus de Spinoza (1632-1677)

Book cover Theologico-Political Treatise — Part 1
Book cover Theologico-Political Treatise — Part 4
Book cover Theologico-Political Treatise — Part 2
Book cover Theologico-Political Treatise — Part 3

By: Charles McRae

Fathers of Biology by Charles McRae Fathers of Biology

An account given of the lives of five great naturalists (Hippocrates, Aristotle, Galen, Vesalius and Harvey) will not be found devoid of interest. The work of each one of them marked a definite advance in the science of Biology. There is often among students of anatomy and physiology a tendency to imagine that the facts with which they are now being made familiar have all been established by recent observation and experiment. But even the slight knowledge of the history of Biology, which may be obtained from a perusal of this little book, will show that, so far from such being the case, this branch of science is of venerable antiquity...

By: Jane Addams (1860-1935)

Twenty Years at Hull-House by Jane Addams Twenty Years at Hull-House

Jane Addams was the first American woman to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In a long, complex career, she was a pioneer settlement worker and founder of Hull-House in Chicago, public philosopher (the first American woman in that role), author, and leader in woman suffrage and world peace. She was the most prominent woman of the Progressive Era and helped turn the nation to issues of concern to mothers, such as the needs of children, public health and world peace. She emphasized that women have a special responsibility to clean up their communities and make them better places to live, arguing they needed the vote to be effective...

By: Russel Doubleday (1872-1949)

Stories of Inventors by Russel Doubleday Stories of Inventors

Doubleday chronicles the history of everyday inventions that form the foundation of technology now common through the world. While some of the inventions are no longer used, each example shows how inventors contributed to technology through perseverance, inspiration and clever observations. In each chapter, he gives a clear, understandable background of the technology.Many of the now outdated inventions may have inspired later inventions by meeting emerging demands. For example, Edison's filament bulb is now being phased out by more efficient CFL's, but Edison's contribution to indoor lighting likewise removed the need for inefficient gas-burning lamps...

By: Elisha Gray (1835-1901)

Nature's Miracles: Familiar Talks on Science by Elisha Gray Nature's Miracles: Familiar Talks on Science

Elisha Gray (August 2, 1835 – January 21, 1901) was an American electrical engineer who co-founded the Western Electric Manufacturing Company. Gray is best known for his development of a telephone prototype in 1876 in Highland Park, Illinois and is considered by some writers to be the true inventor of the variable resistance telephone, despite losing out to Alexander Graham Bell for the telephone patent.

By: Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895)

Book cover Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature
Book cover Evolution of Theology: an Anthropological Study
Book cover On Some Fossil Remains of Man
Book cover On the Relations of Man to the Lower Animals
Book cover Yeast
Book cover William Harvey and the Circulation of the Blood
Book cover Lectures on Evolution
Book cover The Interpreters of Genesis and the Interpreters of Nature
Book cover The Lights of the Church and the Light of Science
Book cover On the Method of Zadig
Book cover The Darwinian Hypothesis
Book cover Lectures and Essays
Book cover Lay Sermons, Addresses and Reviews
Book cover The Rise and Progress of Palaeontology
Book cover Criticism on "The origin of species"
Book cover Hasisadra's Adventure
Book cover Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley — Volume 1
Book cover Note on the Resemblances and Differences in the Structure and the Development of the Brain in Man and Apes
Book cover On the Study of Zoology
Book cover Lectures and Essays
Book cover Darwiniana : Essays — Volume 02

MANUAL OF SURGERY, OXFORD MEDICAL PUBLICATIONSBY ALEXIS THOMSON, F.R.C.S.Ed.PREFACE TO SIXTH EDITION Much has happened since this Manual was last revised, and many surgical lessons have been learned in the hard school of war. Some may yet have to be unlearned, and others have but little bearing on the problems presented to the civilian surgeon. Save in its broadest principles, the surgery of warfare is a thing apart from the general surgery of civil life, and the exhaustive literature now available on every aspect of it makes it unnecessary that it should receive detailed consideration in a manual for students...

Book cover On the Reception of the 'Origin of Species'
Book cover Geological Contemporaneity and Persistent Types of Life
Book cover Time and Life
Book cover Mr.Gladstone and Genesis
Book cover Conditions of Existence as Affecting the Perpetuation of Living Beings
Book cover Coral and Coral Reefs
Book cover The Present Condition of Organic Nature
Book cover Origin of Species
Book cover On the Advisableness of Improving Natural Knowledge
Book cover Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley — Volume 2
Book cover The Perpetuation of Living Beings; hereditary transmission and variation
Book cover On the Origin of Species: or, the Causes of the Phenomena of Organic Nature
Book cover The Past Condition of Organic Nature
Book cover Method By Which the Causes of the Present and Past Conditions of Organic Nature Are to Be Discovered — the Origination of Living Beings

By: Peter C. Welsh

Book cover Woodworking Tools 1600-1900

By: Woods Hutchinson (1862-1930)

Book cover Preventable Diseases
A Handbook of Health by Woods Hutchinson A Handbook of Health

The Woods Hutchinson Health Series, A HANDBOOK OF HEALTHBy Woods Hutchinson, A. M., M. D. PREFACE Looking upon the human body from the physical point of view as the most perfect, most ingeniously economical, and most beautiful of living machines, the author has attempted to write a little handbook of practical instruction for the running of it. And seeing that, like other machines, it derives the whole of its energy from its fuel, the subject of foods--their properties, uses, and methods of preparation--has been gone into with unusual care...

The Child's Day by Woods Hutchinson The Child's Day

The Child's Day, The Woods Hutchinson Health SeriesBy Woods Hutchinson, A.M., M.D. FOREWORD If youth only knew, if old age only could! lamented the philosopher. What is the use, say some, of putting ideas about disease into children's heads and making them fussy about their health and anxious before their time? Precisely because ideas about disease are far less hurtful than disease itself, and because the period for richest returns from sensible living is childhood--and the earlier the better. It is abundantly worth while to teach a child how to protect his health and build up his strength; too many of us only begin to take thought of our health when it is too late to do us much good...

By: Samuel Smiles (1812-1904)

Book cover Industrial Biography, Iron Workers and Tool Makers

By: Robert W. Chambers (1865-1933)

Book cover In Search of the Unknown
Book cover The Gay Rebellion

Page 9 of 32   
Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books