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By: Thomas Hood (1799-1845)

Book cover Death-bed

Thomas Hood was an English poet, author, and humourist, best known for poems such as The Bridge of Sighs and The Song of the Shirt. Hood wrote regularly for The London Magazine, the Athenaeum, and Punch. He later published a magazine largely consisting of his own works. Hood, never robust, lapsed into invalidism by the age of 41 and died at the age of 45. William Michael Rossetti in 1903 called him "the finest English poet" between the generations of Shelley and Tennyson.

By: Various

Book cover Birds and All Nature, Vol. IV, No 6, December 1898

"Birds and All Nature" was a monthly publication of the Nature Study Publishing Company of Chicago. It includes short poems and brief descriptions of birds, animals and other natural subjects with accompanying color plates. The magazine was published from 1897-1907 under the various titles, "Birds," "Birds and all Nature," "Nature and Art" and "Birds and Nature."

By: Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942)

Book cover Watchman and Other Poems

While L. M. Montgomery is better known for her novels, such as Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon, she also wrote hundreds of poems. Her love of beauty, nature, and the sea is evident in this, the only volume of her poetry published during her lifetime.

By: Nathaniel Parker Willis (1806-1867)

Book cover Belfry Pigeon

Nathaniel Parker Willis, also known as N. P. Willis, was an American author, poet and editor who worked with several notable American writers including Edgar Allan Poe and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He became the highest-paid magazine writer of his day. For a time, he was the employer of former slave and future writer Harriet Jacobs.

By: William Combe (1742-1823)

Book cover Tour of Dr. Syntax in Search of the Picturesque

“To bury these, to christen those, And marry such fond folks who chose To change the tenor of their life And risk the matrimonial strife.” This was the humdrum life of Dr. Syntax before he set out on his bizarre and hilarious adventures, presented here in the form of satirical poem in 26 cantos. It’s a lot of fun!

By: Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888)

Book cover Song from the Suds

Librivox volunteers bring you 16 readings of A Song from the Suds, by Louisa May Alcott, author of novels like Little Women. This was the fortnightly poem for June 7-21, 2015.

By: Herbert Allen Giles (1845-1935)

Book cover Chinese Poetry in English Verse (古今詩選)

Dear Land of Flowers, forgive me! -- that I tookThese snatches from thy glittering wealth of song, And twisted to the uses of a book Strains that to alien harps can na'er belong. Thy gems shine purer in their native bed Concealed, beyond the pry of vulgar eyes; And there, through labyrinths of language led, The patient student grasps the glowing prize. Yet many, in their race toward other goals, May joy to feel, albeit at second-hand, Some far faint heart-throb of poetic souls Whose breath makes incense in the flowery Land. Introductory poem by H.A.G.

By: Michael Field (1862/1846-1913/1914)

Book cover July

Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katharine Harris Bradley (27 October 1846 – 26 September 1914) and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper (12 January 1862 – 13 December 1913). As Field they wrote around 40 works together, and a long journal Works and Days. Their intention was to keep the pen-name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning.

By: Various

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 146

This is a collection of 29 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for July 2015.

By: Henry Kendall (1839-1882)

Book cover God Help Our Men at Sea

Kendall was born in a settler's hut by Yackungarrah Creek near Ulladulla, New South Wales, Australia. He was registered as Thomas Henry Kendall, but never appears to have used his first name. His three volumes of verse were all published under the name of "Henry Kendall". ( Wikipedia )

By: Julia Caroline Dorr (1825-1913)

Book cover Afternoon Songs

This is a volume of poems by Julia Caroline Dorr, part 5 of her collected poems.

By: Matthew Arnold (1822-1888)

Book cover Lake

Matthew Arnold was an English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. Matthew Arnold has been characterised as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues. He is sometimes called the third great Victorian poet, along with Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Robert Browning. This week's poem is the first part of Arnold's Lyric Poem 'Switzerland'.

By: John Donne (1572-1631)

Book cover Anniversary Poems

Elizabeth Drury, daughter of Donne's patron, Sir Robert Drury, died in 1610. A year later Donne laments her hyperbolically as the soul of the created universe. In "An Anatomy of the World: The First Anniversary," he poetically scrutinizes that year-old corpse, the world, as if he were performing an autopsy (an "anatomy"). He finds it corrupt in every part, the dead woman having carried with her every spark of goodness it once contained. To commemorate the second anniversary of Miss Drury's death,...

By: Various

Book cover Travels in Lancashire

A collection of fiction, non-fiction and poetry on travels in Lancashire, England, with occasional sorties into adjacent counties.

By: Michael Field (1862/1846-1913/1914)

Book cover September

Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katharine Harris Bradley (27 October 1846 – 26 September 1914) and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper (12 January 1862 – 13 December 1913). As Field they wrote around 40 works together, and a long journal Works and Days. Their intention was to keep the pen-name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning.

By: Various

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 150

This is a collection of 24 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for November 2015.

By: Sara Teasdale (1884-1933)

Book cover Leaves

Autumn, interchangeably known as fall in North America, is one of the four temperate seasons. Autumn marks the transition from summer into winter, in September (Northern Hemisphere) or March (Southern Hemisphere), when the arrival of night becomes noticeably earlier and the temperature cools considerably. One of its main features is the shedding of leaves from deciduous trees. In North America, autumn is usually considered to start with the September equinox (21 or 22) and end with the winter solstice (21 or 22 December). (Wikipedia)

By: Various

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 149

This is a collection of 38 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for October 2015.

By: Julia Caroline Dorr (1825-1913)

Book cover Later Poems

This is the last volume in Julia Caroline Dorr's collected poems, the Later Poems.

By: Anonymous

Book cover Keepsake (version 2)

This is a cute little volume of poems for children. Listeners may wish to refer to the text to see the pretty illustrations.

By: Ann Hawkshaw (1812-1885)

Book cover Dionysius the Areopagite, with other poems

An early figure in the birth of poetry in industrial Manchester, Ann Hawkshaw published three collections and another was circulated privately. Her first collection. published in Manchester and London in 1842, begins with an epic poem, Dionysius the Areopagite. Based on the New Testament story of the conversion of Dionysius by St Paul, much of the poem centres on the consequences of Dionysius' conversion for his betrothed, Myra, and her sister, Corrina. The collection also includes two of Hawkshaw's most important works, The Past and The Future, and a number of shorter poems on themes of history, loss and faith.

By: Various

Book cover Selection of 19th Century Scientific Verse

In the 18th and early 19th centuries, it was common for discoveries in branches of science such as botany, astronomy and medicine to be described in book-length treatises in verse. By the end of the 19th century this mode of popularising science was falling from favour as the studies of science and the humanities diverged and study became more specialised.This small selection of somewhat lighter-hearted verse written by distinguished scientists and mathematicians of the day includes poems by James Clerk Maxwell, William J. Macquorn Rankine and James Joseph Sylvester.

By: Hamlin Garland (1860-1940)

Book cover In the Autumn Grass

LibriVox volunteers take us out on the prairie among the wind and blue stem with readings of In the Autumn Grass by Hamlin Garland. This is the fortnightly poem for November 8, 2015.

By: Augusta Webster (1837-1894)

Book cover Mother and Daughter

Uncompleted at her death, Augusta Webster's posthumously published sonnet sequence Mother and Daughter celebrates the relationship between a mother and her only child. As well as reflecting on aging and mortality, the sonnets express joy and love. This volume includes seven additional sonnets on other themes.

By: Helen Hunt Jackson (1830-1885)

Book cover November

Helen Maria Hunt Jackson, born Helen Fiske was an American poet and writer who became an activist on behalf of improved treatment of Native Americans by the U.S. government. She described the adverse effects of government actions in her history A Century of Dishonor (1881). Her novel Ramona* (1884) dramatized the federal government's mistreatment of Native Americans in Southern California after the Mexican–American War and attracted considerable attention to her cause. Commercially popular, it was estimated to have been reprinted 300 times and most readers liked its romantic and picturesque qualities rather than its political content...

By: Various

Book cover Christmas in Poetry - Carols and Poems

This is a volume of Christmas poems and carols, by various authors and from various times.

By: William Cowper (1731-1800)

Book cover Retired Cat

William Cowper was an English poet and hymnodist. One of the most popular poets of his time, Cowper changed the direction of 18th century nature poetry by writing of everyday life and scenes of the English countryside. In many ways, he was one of the forerunners of Romantic poetry. His religious sentiment and association with John Newton (who wrote the hymn "Amazing Grace") led to much of the poetry for which he is best remembered. His poem "Light Shining out of Darkness" gave English the phrase: "God moves in a mysterious way/His wonders to perform." Wikipedia

By: Various

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 129

This is a collection of 13 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for February 2014.

By: Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis (-2nd Cent.)

Book cover Satires

Decimus Iunius Iuvenalis, known in English as Juvenal, was a Roman poet active in the late 1st and early 2nd century AD. The details of the author's life are unclear, although references within his text to known persons of the late 1st and early 2nd centuries AD fix his terminus post quem (earliest date of composition). The Satires are a collection of satirical poems by Juvenal written in the late 1st and early 2nd centuries AD. Juvenal is credited with sixteen known poems divided among five books; all are in the Roman genre of satire, which, at its most basic in the time of the author, comprised a wide-ranging discussion of society and social mores in dactylic hexameter...

By: Various

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 141

This is a collection of 27 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for February 2015.

By: Omar Khayyám (1048-1131)

Book cover Quatrains of Omar Khayyam of Nishapur

In 1906, Eben Francis Thompson,scholar and poet, published a limited edition of his translation of the Quatrains of Omar Khayyam. This edition contains 878 quatrains, and represents the most extensive translation of Omar's rubai in any language.In the Introduction, Nathan Haskell Dole writes: Mr Thompson has put into English verse this whole body of Persian poetry. It is a marvel of close translation, accurate and satisfactory. He has succeeded in doing exactly what he set out to do - to add nothing and to take nothing away, but to put into the typical quatrain, as determined by Fitzgerald and others, exactly what Omar and his unknown imitators said.

By: Bhartṛhari (c. 400-500)

Book cover Vairagya Shatakam

Vairagya Shatakam is one of the best books that gives the true picture of Renunciation. The book talks on how a common man gets lured by the endless desires which when satisfied fetches him nothing but the desires again. It concludes saying how these unsatiable desires mislead the man from knowing his real nature-omnipotence, omnipresence and omniscience!

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