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Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves Maryland Narratives   By:

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[TR: ] = Transcriber Note [HW: ] = Handwritten Note

SLAVE NARRATIVES

A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves

TYPEWRITTEN RECORDS PREPARED BY THE FEDERAL WRITERS' PROJECT 1936 1938 ASSEMBLED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PROJECT WORK PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION FOR THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA SPONSORED BY THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

WASHINGTON 1941

VOLUME VIII

MARYLAND NARRATIVES

Prepared by the Federal Writers' Project of the Works Progress Administration for the State of Maryland

INFORMANTS

Brooks, Lucy [TR: and Lafayette Brooks]

Coles, Charles

Deane, James V.

Fayman, Mrs. M.S. Foote, Thomas

Gassaway, Menellis

Hammond, Caroline Harris, Page Henson, Annie Young

Jackson, Rev. Silas James, James Calhart James, Mary Moriah Anne Susanna Johnson, Phillip Jones, George

Lewis, Alice Lewis, Perry

Macks, Richard

Randall, Tom

Simms, Dennis

Taylor, Jim

Wiggins, James Williams, Rezin (Parson)

[TR: Interviews were stamped at left side with state name, date, and interviewer's name. These stamps were often partially cut off. Where month could not be determined [ ] substituted. Interviewers' names reconstructed from other, complete entries.]

Maryland [ ] 23 37 Guthrie

AUNT LUCY [HW: BROOKS]. References: Interview with Aunt Lucy and her son, Lafayette Brooks.

Aunt Lucy, an ex slave, lives with her son, Lafayette Brooks, in a shack on the Carroll Inn Springs property at Forest Glen, Montgomery County, Md.

To go to her home from Rockville, leave the Court House going east on Montgomery Ave. and follow US Highway No. 240, otherwise known as the Rockville Pike, in its southeasterly direction, four and one half miles to the junction with it on the left (east) of the Garrett Park Road. This junction is directly opposite the entrance to the Georgetown Preparatory School, which is on the west of this road. Turn left on the Garrett Park Road and follow it through that place and crossing Rock Creek go to Kensington. Here cross the tracks of the B.&O. R.R. and parallel them onward to Forest Glen. From the railroad station in this place go onward to Forest Glen. From the railroad station in this place go onward on the same road to the third lane branching off to the left. This lane will be identified by the sign "Carroll Springs Inn". Turn left here and enter the grounds of the inn. But do not go up in front of the inn itself which is one quarter of a mile from the road. Instead, where the drive swings to the right to go to the inn, bear to the left and continue downward fifty yards toward the swimming pool. Lucy's shack is on the left and one hundred feet west of the pool. It is about eleven miles from Rockville.

Lucy is an usual type of Negro and most probably is a descendant of less remotely removed African ancestors than the average plantation Negroes. She does not appear to be a mixed blood a good guess would be that she is pure blooded Senegambian. She is tall and very thin, and considering her evident great age, very erect, her head is very broad, overhanging ears, her forehead broad and not so receeding as that of the average. Her eyes are wide apart and are bright and keen. She has no defect in hearing.

Following are some questions and her answers:

"Lucy, did you belong to the Carrolls before the war?" "Nosah, I didne lib around heah den. Ise born don on de bay".

"How old are you?"

"Dunno sah. Miss Anne, she had it written down in her book, but she said twas too much trouble for her to be always lookin it up". (Her son, Lafayette, says he was her eldest child and that he was born on the Severn River, in Maryland, the 15th day of October, 1872. Supposing the mother was twenty five years old then, she would be about ninety now. Some think she is more than a hundred years old).

"Who did you belong to?"

"I belonged to Missus Ann Garner".

"Did she have many slaves?"

"Yassuh. She had seventy five left she hadnt sold when the war ended".

"What kind of work did you have to do?"

"O, she would set me to pickin up feathers round de yaird... Continue reading book >>


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