Books Should Be Free
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 56, No. 345, July, 1844   By:

Book cover

First Page:

BLACKWOOD'S

Edinburgh

MAGAZINE.

VOL. LVI.

JULY DECEMBER, 1844.

[Illustration]

1844.

BLACKWOOD'S

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CCCXLV. JULY, 1844. VOL. LVI.

CONTENTS.

CAUSES OF THE INCREASE OF CRIME THE HEART OF THE BRUCE MEMORANDUMS OF A MONTH'S TOUR IN SICILY THE LAST OF THE KNIGHTS POEMS AND BALLADS OF GOETHE. NO. I. MY FIRST LOVE. A SKETCH IN NEW YORK HYDRO BACCHUS MARTIN LUTHER. AN ODE TRADITIONS AND TALES OF UPPER LUSATIA. NO. II. THE FAIRY TUTOR PORTUGAL MARSTON; OR, THE MEMOIRS OF A STATESMAN. PART XII. THE WEEK OF AN EMPEROR

EDINBURGH:

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS, 45, GEORGE STREET; AND 22, PALL MALL, LONDON.

To whom all Communications (post paid) must be addressed.

SOLD BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS THE UNITED KINGDOM.

PRINTED BY BALLANTYNE AND HUGHES, EDINBURGH.

BLACKWOOD'S

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CCCXLV. JULY, 1844. VOL. LVI.

CAUSES OF THE INCREASE OF CRIME.

If the past increase and present amount of crime in the British islands be alone considered, it must afford grounds for the most melancholy forebodings. When we recollect that since the year 1805, that is, during a period of less than forty years, in the course of which population has advanced about sixty five per cent in Great Britain and Ireland, crime in England has increased seven hundred per cent, in Ireland about eight hundred per cent, and in Scotland above three thousand six hundred per cent ;[1] it is difficult to say what is destined to be the ultimate fate of a country in which the progress of wickedness is so much more rapid than the increase of the numbers of the people. Nor is the alarming nature of the prospect diminished by the reflection, that this astonishing increase in human depravity has taken place during a period of unexampled prosperity and unprecedented progress, during which the produce of the national industry had tripled, and the labours of the husbandman kept pace with the vast increase in the population they were to feed in which the British empire carried its victorious arms into every quarter of the globe, and colonies sprang up on all sides with unheard of rapidity in which a hundred thousand emigrants came ultimately to migrate every year from the parent state into the new regions conquered by its arms, or discovered by its adventure. If this is the progress of crime during the days of its prosperity, what is it likely to become in those of its decline, when this prodigious vent for superfluous numbers has come to be in a great measure closed, and this unheard of wealth and prosperity has ceased to gladden the land?

[Footnote 1: See No. 343, Blackwood's Magazine , p. 534, Vol. lv.]

To discover to what causes this extraordinary increase of crime is to be ascribed, we must first examine the localities in which it has principally arisen, and endeavour to ascertain whether it is to be found chiefly in the agricultural, pastoral, or manufacturing districts. We must then consider the condition of the labouring classes, and the means provided to restrain them in the quarters where the progress of crime has been most alarming; and inquire whether the existing evils are insurmountable and unavoidable, or have arisen from the supineness, the errors, and the selfishness of man... Continue reading book >>


Book sections



eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books