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Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Vol 58, No. 357, July 1845   By:

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BLACKWOOD'S

Edinburgh

MAGAZINE

VOL. LVIII.

JULY DECEMBER, 1845.

WILLIAM BLACKWOOD & SONS, EDINBURGH,

AND

37, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON.

1845. BLACKWOOD'S

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CCCLVII. JULY, 1845. Vol. LVIII.

CONTENTS.

MARLBOROUGH, NO. I., 1 PÚSHKIN, THE RUSSIAN POET. NO. II., 28 SUSPIRIA DE PROFUNDIS: BEING A SEQUEL TO THE CONFESSIONS OF AN ENGLISH OPIUM EATER, PART II., 43 NORTHERN LIGHTS, 56 HOUSE HUNTING IN WALES, 74 THE TORQUATO TASSO OF GOETHE, 87 DAVID THE "TELYNWR," OR THE DAUGHTER'S TRIAL; A TALE OF WALES, 96 NORTH'S SPECIMENS OF THE BRITISH CRITICS. NO. VI. SUPPLEMENT TO DRYDEN ON CHAUCER, 114

EDINBURGH: WILLIAM BLACKWOOD AND SONS, 45, GEORGE STREET; AND 37, PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON.

To whom all Communications (post paid) must be addressed.

SOLD BY ALL THE BOOKSELLERS IN THE UNITED KINGDOM.

PRINTED BY BALLANTINE AND HUGHES, EDINBURGH.

BLACKWOOD'S

EDINBURGH MAGAZINE.

No. CCCLVII. JULY, 1845. VOL. LVIII.

MARLBOROUGH.

No. I.

Alexander the Great said, when he approached the tomb of Achilles, "Oh! fortunate youth, who had a Homer to be the herald of your fame!" "And well did he say so," says the Roman historian: "for, unless the Iliad had been written, the same earth which covered his body would have buried his name." Never was the truth of these words more clearly evinced than in the case of the Duke of MARLBOROUGH. Consummate as were the abilities, unbroken the success, immense the services of this great commander, he can scarcely be said to be known to the vast majority of his countrymen. They have heard the distant echo of his fame as they have that of the exploits of Timour, of Bajazet, and of Genghis Khan; the names of Blenheim and Ramillies, of Malplaquet and Oudenarde, awaken a transient feeling of exultation in their bosoms; but as to the particulars of these events, the difficulties with which their general had to struggle, the objects for which he contended, even the places where they occurred, they are, for the most part, as ignorant as they are of similar details in the campaigns of Baber or Aurengzebe. What they do know, is derived chiefly, if not entirely, from the histories of their enemies. Marlborough's exploits have made a prodigious impression on the Continent. The French, who felt the edge of his flaming sword, and saw the glories of the Grande Monarque torn from the long triumphant brow of Louis XIV.; the Dutch, who found in his conquering arm the stay of their sinking republic, and their salvation from slavery and persecution; the Germans, who saw the flames of the Palatinate avenged by his resistless power, and the ravages of war rolled back from the Rhine into the territory of the state which had provoked them; the Lutherans, who beheld in him the appointed instrument of divine vengeance, to punish the abominable perfidy and cruelty of the revocation of the edict of Nantes have concurred in celebrating his exploits. The French nurses frightened their children with stories of "Marlbrook," as the Orientals say, when their horses start, they see the shadow of Richard Coeur de Lion crossing their path... Continue reading book >>


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