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The Mysteries of Paris, Volume 2 of 6   By: (1804-1857)

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Transcriber's Notes:

1. Passages in italics are surrounded by underscores .

2. Passages in Gothic Bold are surrounded by plus signs.

3. Other transcription notes appear at the end of this e text.

[Illustration: " He Took from the Bed a Large Plaid Shawl " Etching by Adrian Marcel, after the drawing by Frank T. Merrill]

The Mysteries of Paris.

ILLUSTRATED WITH ETCHINGS BY MERCIER, BICKNELL, POITEAU, AND ADRIAN MARCEL.

BY EUGENE SUE

IN SIX VOLUMES VOLUME II.

PRINTED FOR FRANCIS A. NICCOLLS & CO. BOSTON

EDITION DE LUXE.

Limited to One Thousand Copies.

No.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE I. THE BALL 11 II. THE RENDEZVOUS 36 III. AN IDYL 61 IV. THE AMBUSCADE 74 V. THE RECTORY HOUSE 88 VI. THE RENCOUNTER 99 VII. AN EVENING AT THE FARM 105 VIII. THE DREAM 150 IX. THE LETTER 159 X. THE HOLLOW WAY 195 XI. CLÉMENCE D'HARVILLE 201 XII. MISERY 256 XIII. JUDGMENT AND EXECUTION 286 XIV. RIGOLETTE 310

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE "HE TOOK FROM THE BED A LARGE PLAID SHAWL" Frontispiece "AT LENGTH ALIGHTED ON HER SHOULDER" 66 "'SO I HAVE BROUGHT TURK WITH ME'" 97 "'YOU MUST GIVE ME LEAVE'" 208

THE MYSTERIES OF PARIS.

CHAPTER I.

THE BALL.

Belonging to one of the first families in France, still young, and with a face that would have been agreeable had it not been for the almost ridiculous and disproportionate length of his nose, M. de Lucenay joined to a restless love of constant motion the habit of talking and laughing fearfully loud upon subjects quite at variance with good taste or polished manners, and throwing himself into attitudes so abrupt and awkward that it was only by recalling who he was, that his being found in the midst of the most distinguished societies in Paris could be accounted for, or a reason assigned for tolerating his gestures and language; for both of which he had now, by dint of long practice and adherence, acquired a sort of free license or impunity. He was shunned like the plague, although not deficient in a certain description of wit, which told here and there amid the indescribable confusion of remarkable phraseology which he allowed himself the use of; in fact, he was one of those unintentional instruments of vengeance one would always like to employ in the wholesale chastisement of persons who have rendered themselves either ridiculous or abhorrent.

The Duchess de Lucenay, one of the most agreeable, and, at the same time, most fashionable women in Paris (spite of her having numbered thirty summers), had more than once furnished matter of conversation among the scandal dealers of Paris; but her errors, whatever they were supposed to be, were pardoned, in consideration of the heavy drawback of such a partner as M. de Lucenay.

Another feature in the character of this latter named individual was a singular affectation of the most absurd and unknown expressions, relative to imaginary complaints and ridiculous infirmities he amused himself in supposing you suffered from, and concerning which he would make earnest inquiries, in a loud voice, and in the immediate presence of a hundred persons... Continue reading book >>


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