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The Mysteries of Paris, Volume 3 of 6   By: (1804-1857)

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Transcriber's Notes:

1. Passages in italics are surrounded by underscores .

2. Passages in Gothic Bold are surrounded by plus signs.

3. Other transcription notes appear at the end of this e text.

[Illustration: Took my head between his hands. Original Etching by Mercier.]

The Mysteries of Paris.

ILLUSTRATED WITH ETCHINGS BY MERCIER, BICKNELL, POITEAU, AND ADRIAN MARCEL.

BY EUGENE SUE

IN SIX VOLUMES VOLUME III.

PRINTED FOR FRANCIS A. NICCOLLS & CO. BOSTON

Edition de Luxe

This edition is limited to one thousand copies, of which this is

No.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE I. THE TEMPLE 11 II. THE ARREST 52 III. JACQUES FERRAND 108 IV. THE OFFICE 116 V. THE CLIENTS 137 VI. THE ANONYMOUS LETTER 167 VII. REFLECTIONS 197 VIII. THE BACHELORS' BREAKFAST 211 IX. ST. LAZARE 225 X. MONT SAINT JEAN 240 XI. LA LOUVE AND LA GOUALEUSE 255 XII. THE PROTECTRESS 285 XIII. THE FORCED FRIENDSHIP 300 XIV. CECILY 313

ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE TOOK MY HEAD BETWEEN HIS HANDS Frontispiece DREW CAREFULLY OUT A SHEET OF PAPER 35 MOREL FELL BACK ON THE STOOL 83 HE WILL SCOLD YOU AWFULLY 134 M. D'HARVILLE HAD BLOWN HIS BRAINS OUT 222 LA GOUALEUSE IN THE PRISON 279

THE MYSTERIES OF PARIS.

CHAPTER I.

THE TEMPLE.

To the deep snow which had fallen during the past night had succeeded a very sharp wind, so that the ordinarily muddy pavement was hard and dry, as Rigolette and Rodolph wended onwards to the immense and singular bazar called the Temple, the young girl leaning unceremoniously on the arm of her cavalier, who, on his part, appeared as much at his ease as though they had been old familiar friends.

"What a funny old woman Madame Pipelet is!" observed the grisette to her companion; "and what very odd things she says!"

"Well, I thought her remarks very striking, as well as appropriate."

"Which of them, neighbour?"

"Why, when she said 'Young people would be young people,' and ' Vive l'amour! '"

"Well?"

"Well! I only mean to say those are precisely my sentiments."

"Your sentiments?"

"Yes, I should like nothing better than to pass my youth with you, taking ' Vive l'amour! ' for my motto."

"I dare say, for certainly you are not hard to please."

"Why, where would be the harm, are we not near neighbours? Of course we are, or else I should not be seen walking out with you in this manner in broad day."

"Then you allow me to hope "

"Hope what?"

"That you will learn to love me."

"Oh, bless you, I do love you already!"

"Really?"

"To be sure I do. Why, how can I help it? You are good and gay; though poor yourself, you have done all in your power by interesting rich people in the fate of the Morels; your appearance pleases me; and you have altogether a nice look, and a sort of air such as one is glad to find in a person we expect to go about with a great deal. So there, I think, are abundant reasons for my loving you."

Then, suddenly breaking into loud fits of laughter, Rigolette abruptly exclaimed, "Look there, only look at that fat woman with the furred shoes! What does she remind you of? I'll tell you, of a great sack being drawn along by two cats without tails!" and again she laughed merrily... Continue reading book >>


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