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The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume 1   By: (1850-1893)

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First Page:

The Works of

Guy de Maupassant

VOLUME I

BOULE DE SUIF

AND OTHER STORIES

NATIONAL LIBRARY COMPANY

NEW YORK

1909

BIGELOW, SMITH & CO.

CONTENTS

PAGE INTRODUCTION x

BOULE DE SUIF 1

MISS HARRIET 54

FRANCESCA AND CARLOTTA RONDOLI 82

CHÂLI 117

THE UMBRELLA 131

MY UNCLE SOSTHENES 143

HE? 152

A PHILOSOPHER 162

ALWAYS LOCK THE DOOR! 171

A MEETING 179

THE LITTLE CASK 190

HOW HE GOT THE LEGION OF HONOR 198

THE ACCURSED BREAD 206

WHAT WAS REALLY THE MATTER WITH ANDREW 213

MY LANDLADY 221

THE HORLA, OR MODERN GHOSTS 228

LOVE. THREE PAGES FROM A SPORTSMAN'S BOOK 263

THE HOLE 270

SAVED 279

BELLFLOWER 286

THE MARQUIS DE FUMEROL 293

THE SIGNAL 303

THE DEVIL 311

EPIPHANY 321

IN THE WOOD 336

A FAMILY 343

JOSEPH 350

THE INN 358

UGLY 376

WORKS OF GUY DE MAUPASSANT

INTRODUCTION

BY

ARTHUR SYMONS

The first aim of art, no doubt, is the representation of things as they are. But then things are as our eyes see them and as our minds make them; and it is thus of primary importance for the critic to distinguish the precise qualities of the eyes and minds which make the world into imaginative literature. Reality may be so definite and so false, just as it may be so fantastic and so true; and, among work which we can apprehend as dealing justly with reality, there may be quite as much difference in all that constitutes outward form and likeness as there is between a Dutch interior by Peter van der Hooch, the portrait of a king by Velasquez, and the image of a woman smiling by Leonardo da Vinci. The soul, for instance, is at heart as real as the body; but, as we can hear it only through the body speaking, and see it only through bodily eyes, and measure it, often enough, only in the insignificant moment of its action, it may come to seem to us, at all events less realizable; and thus it is that we speak of those who have vividly painted exterior things as realists. Properly speaking, Maupassant is no more a realist than Maeterlinck. He paints a kind of reality which it is easier for us to recognize; that is all.

Every artist has his own vision of the world. Maupassant's vision was of solid superficies, of texture which his hands could touch, of actions which his mind could comprehend from the mere sight of its incidents. He saw the world as the Dutch painters saw it, and he was as great a master of form, of rich and sober color, of the imitation of the outward gestures of life, and of the fashion of external things. He had the same view of humanity, and shows us, with the same indifference, the same violent ferment of life the life of full blooded people who have to elbow their way through the world... Continue reading book >>


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