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Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 101, August 29, 1891   By:

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"Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 101, August 29, 1891" is a humorous and satirical magazine that offers a window into the social and political issues of late 19th century Britain. The witty cartoons, clever commentary, and sharp wit make for an entertaining read that sheds light on the attitudes and controversies of the time. The various contributors showcase their talents for humor and satire, poking fun at everything from politicians to societal norms. While some references may be dated, the overall themes of human nature and society are still relevant today. Overall, this volume of Punch is a delightful and insightful look at Victorian-era England.

First Page:

PUNCH,

OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI.

VOL. 101.

August 29, 1891.

STORICULES.

I. THE SUICIDE ADVERTISEMENT.

[Illustration]

As you stood before the automatic machine on the station platform, making an imbecile choice between a packet of gooseberry nougat and a slab of the gum caramel, you could not help seeing on the level of your eye this notice: "BLACKING CREAM. ASK FOR HIGLINSON'S, AND TAKE NO OTHER."

Similar announcements met you on every hoarding, in almost every paper and magazine, on every omnibus. Neat little packets of HIGLINSON's Blacking cream were dropped through your letter box, with a printed request that you would honour Mr. HIGLINSON by trying it. Leaflets were handed you in the street to tell you what public analysts said about it, and in what great hotels it was the only blacking used. Importunity pays. Sooner or later you bought HIGLINSON's Blacking cream. You then found out that it was just about as good as any other, and went on buying it.

In one way this was very good for Mr. HIGLINSON, because he became very rich; in other ways it was not so good for him. For a long time he had nothing to do with public life; the public never thought about his existence; to the public he was not a man at all he was only part of the name of the stuff they used for their boots... Continue reading book >>


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