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Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 103, September 17, 1892   By:

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PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI

VOL. 103

SEPTEMBER 17, 1892

HEARING HIMSELF.

( MYSTERIOUS MEM. FROM A HAWARDEN NOTE BOOK. )

Exceedingly kind and flattering of MAX MÜLLER! "I hope there are but few here present who have never enjoyed the privilege of listening to Mr. GLADSTONE." Ha! ha! He little thought there was one there who had not "enjoyed that privilege." Have enjoyed most privileges in my time, but never that of "hearing myself as others hear me" more or less. "Unavoidable absence of Mr. GLADSTONE!" Ho! ho! Then my disguise was perfect. Get myself up as a Liberal Unionist, with wig and eye glass. Not likely anybody would recognise me in that rig.

Rather enjoyed myself and my paper, "Phoenician Elements in the Homeric Poems." Most seductive title! Such a popular touch about it! Think I shall have it printed as a "leaflet" for distribution among Workmen's Clubs and Radical Associations. Might conciliate those well meaning but illogical Eight Hour Men. Wonder if KEIRHARDIE would like a copy. What more nicely calculated to cheer the scant leisure of Labour?

Funny to hear my own sinuous sentences coming back to me from mouth of another. Not quite sure MAX is so "fascinating in his voice, and so persuasive in his delivery" as but no matter. Can't say as MAX did "I felt myself carried away, and convinced almost against my will." Not at all! Wonder what he meant by that? Why "against his will"? That's what Liberal Unionists, and other preposterous and illogical opponents of mine say in House, when they compliment me on my "eloquence," and then vote against me! Absurd! Wish they'd drop their compliments and vote straight.

"Small and exotic contribution" to Oriental Congress! Neat description of paper running to nearly four columns of Times . "Intense sentiment of nationality, which led the Greeks of later days to covet the title of Autochthones." Wonder if that reminded MAX, or anyone else, of another race with "an intense sentiment of nationality," and a passionate love of the land from which they sprang. Wonder whether, if Nationalists were to call themselves "Auctochthones" instead of Home Rulers, we should get along better? Must consult JUSTIN on this point. Should have to teach some of them to pronounce their new name, though. "Autochthones," spoken in wrath, with a rich brogue, after dinner, would, I should think, beat Phillippopolis, or "Ri' l'il, ti' li'l Isl'l" hollow.

Anax andron , too, might be useful. Say, as substitute for that everlasting G.O.M., of which I admit I'm heartily sick, Lord of Men! Not King of Men, of course. LABBY might kick at latter. "Nothing can be simpler than the meaning of the two words." Exactly. Must get HARCOURT to popularise these. Applied to AGAMEMNON. Why not to "strong men" who live after AGAMEMNON? "Evidence from extraneous sources of connection between title of Anax andron and great Egyptian Empire." Aha! I may yet have to play the Anax andron in Egypt as before. Allegory I mean Anax andron on banks of Nile! Good and not a Malapropism, whatever WOLSELEY may say. "Title of Anax andron descendible" (good word, "descendible") "from father to son, and accorded in the poems to personages altogether secondary, viz. , EUMELOS and EUPHETES." Wonder what my EUMELOS HERBERT will say to that!

Enjoyed it much whilst MAX was "mouthing out" (as Mrs. BROWNING says) my eulogy of that man of "Phoenician stamp," the "universal ODYSSEUS," who expressed the many sided, the all accomplished man; the polutropos , the polumetis , the tlemon , the polutlas , the polumekanos , the poikilometis , the poluphron , the daïphron , the talasiphron. (What a peck of p's!) In battle never foiled! In council supreme! His oratory like the snow flakes of the winter storm. Superbly representative Phoenician! "But over and above this universality of ODYSSEUS in the arts of life, he bears the Phoenician stamp in what may be termed his craft." Aha! The "Old Parliamentary Hand" of his period plainly... Continue reading book >>


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