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Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 156, June 11, 1919   By:

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PUNCH,

OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI.

VOL. 156.

June 11, 1919.

CHARIVARIA.

"Every British working man has as much right as any Member of Parliament to be paid £400 a year," states a well known Labour paper. We have never questioned this for a moment.

"Women," says a technical journal, "are a source of grave danger to motorists in crowded city streets." It is feared in some quarters that they will have to be abolished.

"Are you getting stout?" asks a Sunday contemporary. Only very occasionally, we regret to say.

The heat was so oppressive in London the other day that a taxi driver at Euston Station was seen to go up to a pedestrian and ask him if he could do with a ride. He was eventually pinned down by some colleagues and handed over to the care of his relatives.

"I do not care a straw about Turkey," writes Mr. LOVAT Fraser in The Daily Mail . It is this dare devil spirit which has made us the nation we are.

Superstition in regard to marriage is dying out, says a West End registrar. Nevertheless the superstition that a man who gets married between January 1st and December 31st is asking for trouble is still widely held.

Mr. VAN INGEN, a New York business man, has just started to cross the Atlantic for the one hundred and sixtieth time. It is not known whether the major ambition of his life is to leave New York or go back and have a last look at it.

"There is no likelihood," says the FOOD CONTROLLER, "of cheese running out during the coming winter." A pan of drinking water left in the larder will always prevent its running out and biting someone during the dog days.

Sympathetic readers will be glad to hear that the little sixpence which was found wandering in Piccadilly Circus has been given a good home by an Aberdeen gentleman.

Aeroplane passengers are advised by one enterprising weekly not to throw bottles out of the machine. This is certainly good advice. The bottles are so apt to get broken.

Germany, it is expected, will sign the Peace treaty this once, but points out that we must not allow it to happen again.

Of two burglars charged at Stratford one told the Bench that he intended to have nothing further to do with his colleague in future. It is said that he finds it impossible to work with him owing to his nasty grasping ways.

Sixty seven fewer babies were born in one Surrey village last year than in previous years. It would be interesting to have their names.

A grocer, according to a legal writer, is not compelled to take goods out of the window to oblige a customer. The suggestion that a grocer is expected to oblige anybody in any circumstances is certainly a novelty.

Uxbridge, says The Evening News , has no bandstand. Nor have we, but we make no fuss about it.

The Bolshevists in Russia, we are told, are busy sowing seeds of sedition. For some time it has been suspected that the Bolshevists were up to no good.

HERBERT WELSH, aged sixty seven, has started to walk from New Jersey to New Hampshire, U.S.A., a distance of five hundred miles. In the absence of fuller details we assume that HERBERT must have lost his train.

"Postage stamps," says a weekly snippets paper, "can be obtained at all post offices." This should prove a boon to those who have letters to write.

It is thought if a certain well known judge does not soon ask, "What is whisky?" he will have to content himself with the past tense.

"What to do with a Wasp" is a headline in a contemporary. We have not read the article, but our own plan with wasps is to try to dodge them.

We hear that complications may arise from an unfortunate mistake made at a Jazz Competition held in London last week. It appears that the prize was awarded to a lady suffering from hysteria who was not competing... Continue reading book >>


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